Francesca Pasquali

 

Francesca Pasquali transforms plastic industrial materials into objects and installations that emulate natural shapes and structures that she’s observed. Her art includes everything from drinking straws to balloons to neoprene, and dozens more interesting materials in between. Be sure and have a look at Pasquali’s entire portfolio to see the extent for yourself!

 

 

 

 

 

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Phoebe Cummings

 

There are so many things I love about Phoebe Cummings‘ sculptures. She primarily works with greenware – AKA unfired clay – and other supportive elements to create these pieces that are built on site and will only last as long as their respective exhibition. Because Cummings’ sculptures are the natural color of the clay they look as though they’d be right at home adorning an immaculate mausoleum.

 

 

 

 

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Julia Haft-Candell

 

Ceramicist Julia Haft-Candell‘s The Infinite examines the idea behind the title and concept through a series of two dozen black clay sculptures and five rock-like pieces constructed from the scraps of those sculptures, called Weights. Each looping variation features a pattern across its surface – wave, arch, chain, eye, weave, knot, or braid – and you can read more about each in the project’s accompanying glossary of terms and symbols.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Joy Dilworth

 

Joy Dilworth‘s textile sculptures and objects have my jaw on the floor this morning. By using soft materials and textile techniques, she taps into universal memories via the experience of touch. Dilworth expresses meaning through her careful consideration of materials and the processes she uses to manipulate them.

 

 

 

 

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Samuel Shumway

 

Samuel Shumway is a stop motion animator, videographer, prop designer, and fabricator (whew) based in NYC. He sculpts these delectable little meals entirely out of paper, snipping and folding until every little bit is just so. Anyone hungry for pancakes all of a sudden??

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lin Cheung / Delayed Reactions

 

Simple statement pins are generally intended as a cheap throwaway, but Lin Cheung has reimagined them as more in her Delayed Reactions series. Rather than cheap metal, Cheung used semi-precious materials and stones to make her carved brooches. Her approach to designing and reinterpreting traditional jewelery and objects is a personal response to everyday experiences and observations – in this case her mixed emotions about current affairs.

 

 

 

 

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James Lake

 

Sculptor James Lake chose cardboard with which to create his lifelike sculptures because it’s a non-traditional option and he wouldn’t need a studio to work. He later found the benefits to include how inexpensive the material is and how easy it is to recycle! And by blurring the line between high and lowbrow art and making sculpture affordable, Lake has been able to take his art to the community through resources and workshops.

 

 

 

 

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Nobel Truong’s Acrylic Plants

 

If warmer weather hasn’t quite reached you yet, consider Nobel Truong‘s acrylic plants. The extensive line features translucent cacti, lamps, leaves, and other accessories inspired by Bauhaus architecture and the Memphis Group. Check out Truong’s shop to bring a piece home!

 

 

 

 

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Luke O’Sullivan

 

Luke O’Sullivan‘s architecturally inspired sculptures and prints are endlessly fascinating. He uses screen printed drawings to create 2D and 3D works that explore undiscovered underground places.

Early interests in Nintendo games, maps, and science fiction movies contribute to the playful nature of my art. I like to describe my process as creating a lego set using my own hand drawn pieces. I use those pieces to create elaborate sculptures of cities, labyrinths and fantastical objects. Exploration and adventure are central to everything I make with each drawing and sculpture contributing to an ongoing catalogue of a strange invented world.

Shop Luke O’Sullivan’s work

 

 

 

 

 

 

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