CASETiFY’s Phone Cases Take It to the Next Level with Art + Customization

 

Our phones are practically part of our wardrobes at this point, so it only makes sense that you would want a case that reflects your own personal style aesthetic. I’ve used phone cases from so many companies over the years, and the latest I’ve put to the test are from CASETiFY. I’m clumsy, I even managed to crack off a corner of Apple’s own silicone case, so when I say “test” you can believe it’s true. After a few weeks of use I can vouch for these guys, the side bumpers are especially tough which I love. Almost as much as I love the vast selection and customization options. Customize the heck out of one of their cases or go even further and design your own. CASETiFY is the leading artist-based community in the tech realm, which I’m happy to share and support – to be honest, it’s what sent me their way in the first place.

 

 

CASETiFY’s latest collaborative collection is with Amsterdam-based illustrator Bodil Jane, who I’m a longtime fan of. Her playful designs are available for both your phone and your Apple Watch. I went with the Eyes design, it allows the color of your phone to show through as the background and the eyes have the slightest bit of texture to them.

Bodil shares, “To celebrate the arrival of Spring, I wanted to incorporate lots of plants and nature-inspired designs, mixed into a collection full of playful colors. Much of the inspiration comes from my collection of antique botanical books. I wanted the collection to feel fresh, light and like something everyone wants to carry around all spring and summer. I’m really happy with the outcome!”

 

 

 

You just can’t go wrong with a clean marble look, seen here in minimal white. After having a few cases that were made of actual marble, which I promptly damaged, this looks just like the real deal and doesn’t weigh nearly as much.

 

 

 

This Neon Sand case will be going on my phone as soon as summer makes an appearance. The collection is available in four colors (VIP berry/violet seen here) and has some customization available that I opted out of. It’s a nice stress reliever to watch the sand move around the case and get this – it glows in the dark! If that doesn’t say SUMMER FUN, I’m not sure what does.

 

 

 

I received product from CASETiFY in exchange for this post. Thank you for supporting the brands that help keep Design Crush creating fresh content! You can also check out their exclusive collections with Nordstrom and Anthropologie.

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Olga Pokhodzey / Growing Up

 

Russian-born artist Olga Pokhodzey was focused solely on street photography before turning towards self-portraiture and creating the series seen here – Growing Up. Be sure to check out the rest of the series on her site.

“This series of self portraits is about relationships between people and things. Our surrounding objects were made for our comfort and designed to help us in everyday life and creative activities, but there is another side — sometimes we feel tied too tight with them, as if things appropriate us. I work from home, and sometimes spend 12–14 hours a day in front of my computer. In such periods I practically don’t walk out, and then I begin to complain to my friends about feeling like growing into my chair. I decided to show this metaphor literally. Besides the theme of ingrowth, this series is about envy for the essence of objects. Compared to the human body, things are more sustainable.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chalk Drawers

 

All it takes is imagination to redesign something that’s been taken for granted, like say a stick of chalk. Nikolas Bentel is ridiculously creative (he’s currently a resident at the New Museum design incubator program NEW INC.) and also ridiculously nice (I spent some time with him at ICFF last May). His ingenious Chalk Drawers are architectural drawing toys made of chalk, designed to create original patterns that are geometrically precise. The three drawers are designed to make dots, circles, or straight lines to give the user tools to create the three fundamental building blocks of drawing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Carlson Hatton

 

Los Angeles-based Carlson Hatton is an artist as well as a full-time professor of art at Santa Monica College. His mixed media creations use acrylic, airbrush, watercolor, and graphite layered onto aluminum, paper, or wood to address the extinction of humankind’s ability to process imagery in a meaningful way.

 

 

 

 

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Spring ’19 Book Recommendations

A Year Off: A story about traveling the world – and how to make it happen for you by Alexandra Brown and David Brown
One part travel guide, one part travel essays and photos, and one part memoir documenting the story of Alexandra and David Brown, a couple who decided to take a year off from their jobs and ‘regular lives’ to travel the world together after only knowing each other for a few months. Each chapter provides perspectives from both authors and tackles a different part of the journey.

So Here I Am: Speeches by great women to empower and inspire by Anna Russell and Camila Pinheiro
A book about women at the forefront of change — within politics, science, human rights, and media; discussing everything from free love, anti-war, scientific discoveries, race, gender, and women’s rights. From Emmeline Pankhurst’s Freedom or Death speech and Marie Curie’s trailblazing Nobel lecture, to Michelle Obama speaking on parenthood in politics and Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza’s ode to black women, the words collected here are empowering, engaging, and inspiring.

Mending Matters: Stitch, Patch, and Repair Your Favorite Denim & More by Katrina Rodabaugh
This book includes more than 20 hands-on projects that showcase current trends in visible mending that are edgy, modern, and bold — but draw on traditional stitching. It does all this through four simple mending techniques: exterior patches, interior patches, slow stitches, darning, and weaving. In addition, the book addresses the way mending leads to a more mindful relationship to fashion and to overall well-being. In essays that accompany each how-to chapter, Rodabaugh explores mending as a metaphor for appreciating our own naturally flawed selves, and she examines the ways in which mending teaches us new skills, self-reliance, and confidence, all gained from making things with our own hands.

the witch doesn’t burn in this one by Amanda Lovelace
The witch: supernaturally powerful, inscrutably independent, and now — indestructible. These moving, relatable poems encourage resilience and embolden women to take control of their own stories. Enemies try to judge, oppress, and marginalize her, but the witch doesn’t burn in this one.

Make Ink: A Forager’s Guide to Natural Inkmaking by Jason Logan
The Toronto Ink Company was founded in 2014 by designer and artist Jason Logan as a citizen science experiment to make eco-friendly, urban ink from street-harvested pigments. In Make Ink, Logan delves into the history of inkmaking and the science of distilling pigment from the natural world. Readers will learn how to forage for materials such as soot, rust, cigarette butts, peach pits, and black walnut, then how to mix, test, and transform these ingredients into rich, vibrant inks that are sensitive to both place and environment.

 

Feck Perfuction: Dangerous Ideas on the Business of Life by James Victore
Renowned designer and professional hell-raiser James Victore wants to drag you off your couch and throw you headfirst into a life of bold creativity. He’ll guide you through all the twists, trials, and triumphs of starting your creative career, from finding your voice to picking the right moment to start a project (hint: It’s now). Bring your biggest, craziest, most revolutionary ideas, and he’ll give you the kick in the pants you need to make them real. No matter what industry or medium you work in, this book will help you live, work, and create freely and fearlessly.

The Art of Feminism: Images that Shaped the Fight for Equality, 1857-2017 by Lucinda Gosling, Hilary Robinson, and Amy Tobin
A comprehensive international survey of feminist art – from highlighting the posters of the Suffrage Atelier, through the radical art of Judy Chicago and Carrie Mae Weems, to the cutting-edge work of Sethembile Msezane and Andrea Bowers, this book traces the way feminists have shaped visual arts and media throughout history. Featuring more than 350 works of art, illustration, photography, performance, and graphic design-along with essays examining the legacy of the radical canon-this rich volume showcases the vibrancy of the feminist aesthetic over the last 150 years.

I Am Her Tribe by Danielle Doby
#IAmHerTribe creator Danielle Doby shares her poetry for the first time, I Am Her Tribe is a collection drawing on the viral Instagram handle and online hashtag that serves to create moments of connection through empowerment and storytelling.

The Future is Feminist: Radical, Funny, and Inspiring Writing by Women by Mallory Farrugia
A roster of iconic women write about what it means to be a feminist yesterday, today, and tomorrow. These poets, essayists, activists, actors, and professors address topics ranging from workplace harassment to resting bitch face. The results are refreshing, provocative, moving, and hilarious. A diverse chorus of intersectional voices and a forward-looking stance set this book apart. It’s the smart, covetable anthology that women of all ages will turn to for support and inspiration in the ongoing fight for gender equality.

Draw & Be Happy: Art Exercises to Bring You Joy by Tim Shaw and Cachetejack
This illustrated handbook offers easy-to-follow drawing exercises — some thought-provoking, some meditative, all fun — inspired by art-therapy practices. Each page features an activity written by artist and activist Tim Shaw and brought to life with art from Spanish illustration duo Cachetejack, offering readers simple strategies for boosting their confidence, reducing stress, and expressing themselves in meaningful and joyful new ways.

Single-Handedly: Contemporary Architects Draw by Hand by Nalina Moses
An inspiring collection of 220 hand drawings by more than forty emerging architects and well-known practitioners from around the world, this book explores the reasons they draw by hand and gives testimony to the continued vitality of hand drawing in architecture. The powerful yet intimate drawings carry larger propositions about materials, space, and construction, and each one stands on its own as a work of art.

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Zoe Wodarz

 

If bold colors and playful trends are your style, you’re going to want to check out the work of Zoe Wodarz. Her art expertise is across the board in trend research, surface design, pattern, illustration, product ideation, and product line development. In other words, if you want a fresh look for your brand she’s your go-to lady.

Shop Zoe Wodarz work

 

 

 

 

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