Alan Belcher

 

Alan Belcher is known for developing the ‘photo object’ genre of art, in other words artworks that combine photography and sculpture. In this series the universal jpeg icon has been turned into a 3D object that deceives the eyes. This ceramic multiple edition is entitled _____.jpg and was fabricated in China in an edition of 125, each signed, numbered, and dated.

 

 

 

 

0

Andrew Ooi

 

Canadian painter, sculptor, and pattern-maker Andrew Ooi individually creases, unfolds, paints, and re-folds each piece of paper in his art by hand before assembling them all together. By combining color, pattern, and shape, Ooi creates a well-organized natural order.

“My art is about making sense of the world. It is about arranging the disparate shapes and elements I perceive environments, histories, geographies, art, artistry and human nature to be made up of into tangible systems and forms,” explains Andrew. “It is about occupying these realities, ideas and interests in feeling and being, to allow meaning and its significance in the long view, to develop measuredly.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Olivia Walker

 

At first look, the porcelain works of Olivia Walker seem to have some sort of botanical influence. Turns out it’s coral. Walker explores growth and decay through the addition and subtraction of tiny pieces of porcelain clay to the initial vessel she’s created, each shape speaking to her and dictating the final result.

 

 

 

 

0

Josie Lewis

 

Multidisciplinary artist Josie Lewis creates works that make me – and I’m guessing lots of others – insanely happy! Winding trails of graduated colored circles that travel over and under themselves on their journey, abstract moments caught forever in resin that remind me of the prettiest petri dishes, and so much more.

Shop Josie Lewis’ work

 

 

 

 

0

Gloria Landenberger

 

I’ve been thinking a bit about what’s on my own Christmas list this year and I wouldn’t mind one little bit if one of Gloria Landenberger‘s handmade ceramic masks showed up under the tree. Each one is made and assembled by hand in limited editions, the end result being glazed stoneware with a unique look.

 

 

0

Isobelle Ouzman

 

Dumpster diving has really paid off for Seattle-based artist Isobelle Ouzman. She takes books that others have discarded and creates scenes for viewers to dive right into, whether they’re looking for a dark nightscape or a fantastical escape.

 

 

 

 

 

0

Splice

 

Splice is a collaborative project between photographer Andrew McGibbon and art director Cassandra Fumi. Each piece of ice art is only temporary – an act of self-destruction on display for only a short amount of time. Beet juice, puzzle pieces, toy cars and more filled each block before being photographed and dissipating entirely. What’s more, each print is a unique one of a kind, meaning there is only one print available for each piece.

 

 

 

 

0

Erika Sanada / Odd Things

 

Erika Sanada‘s Odd Things sculptures are beautifully disturbing. Her strange, creepy creatures have extra body parts or small deformities that set them apart while also resembling adorable animals that you wouldn’t mind snuggling up with. I love the detailed skin and musculature that Sanada captures so well.

 

 

 

 

 

0

Damien Hirst

 

Damien Hirst is known for being a somewhat controversial artist, but his The Anatomy of an Angel Carrera marble hewn sculpture caught my eye months ago and remained in the back of my mind. Hirst’s fascination with beauty, religion, science, life, and death are all come together as the feminine figure is dissected down to different levels of organs and bone.

 

 

0

Jaime Keiter

 

Jaime Keiter‘s one-of-a-kind geometric sculptures use clay as canvas, a series of paintings collaged from individually hand crafted and glazed porcelain stoneware tiles create the eventual wallhanging. Her process begins with cutting geometric and organic shapes from clay slabs, underglazing patterns and textures, and then finishing each tile with a variety of different mid-fire glazes. The collages are then pieced together to create small geometric sculptures and larger grouted works.

Shop Jaime Keiter’s work

 

 

 

 

0