Louise McRae

 

New Zealand’s Louise McRae‘s sculptural wall art uses discarded building materials that she paints and splits into smaller shards. Each piece ends up feeling as though it’s organically found its place among the hundreds of others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ry Rocklen / Wardrobe

 

If my clothes looked this good when folded, well, they definitely wouldn’t sit in the laundry basket waiting for as long as they do. Los Angeles-based artist Ry Rocklen‘s Wardrobe is made entirely out of porcelain, assuring only intended wrinkles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Zemer Peled

 

Landscapes, nature, memories, identity, and place. All influence the large- and small-scale ceramic shard sculptures and installations created by Zemer Peled. Is it just me or are you dying to hold one in your hands, too?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Laura Moriarty

 

I want to get up close and personal with Laura Moriarty’s sculptural paintings to see what each of those lovely layers is all about. The geological references are apparent, but I’ll let Laura explain her process.

Layers of color form the strata of a methodology in which the immediacy of the hand can translate a sense of deep time. Working and reworking molten, richly pigmented beeswax, I build each painting/object through a slow, simple yet strenuous physical engagement, which often becomes a metaphor for the ephemerality of life and civilization. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Crystal Morey / Delicate Dependencies

 

Bay Area-based sculptor Crystal Morey‘s rural Northern California upbringing shaped her perspective on nature and how humans interact with land, animals, and each other. All of that is evident in her Delicate Dependencies porcelain series that pairs the female form with different species of animals native to the western United States.

These creatures exist in habitats stressed or impacted by human activity, leading them to an unclear future. They inhabit a space where the relationship between humans, and the plants and animals around them, are intricately and physically bound together, dependent on each other for their long-term viability. Sculpted from the silken white earth of porcelain, I see these delicate figures as containing power, as modern talismans and precious telling objects. They see a heightened vision of human influence in the natural world and are here to remind us of our current trajectory and the delicate dependencies we all share.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lana Crooks

 

A combination of science and fantasy, Lana Crooks works with fabrics and found objects to create faux specimens and soft curiosities. Her technique easily fools you into believing what you’re looking at is actual bone that’s been bleached by the sun.

 

 

 

 

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Mélanie Bourget

 

French sculptor Mélanie Bourget‘s ceramic busts and faces are so full of personality that it’s difficult believing they aren’t about to start a conversation with you. Her style straddles the line between realism and fantasy, and I’d love to hear the stories each one has to tell.

 

 

 

 

 

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Johnson Tsang

 

Johnson Tsang‘s completely contorted facial sculptures are so absurd they’re lovely. Hands play a major role in his Open Mind Series – extremities reaching up and out, stretching open an eye socket, or even squishing the face as you would a child’s. While maybe not for the faint of heart, each piece manages to look serene in all white bisque.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saerom Yoon / Crystal Series

 

Saerom Yoon is an artist based in Seoul, he studied furniture design at Hongik University with a focus on woodworking. In his Crystal Series, Yoon took that knowledge and translated it into acrylics with colorful gradients. In the end its optical illusion that creates the beautifully blended hues. The surface of the acrylic is dyed and once the pieces come together magic occurs.

 

 

 

 

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