10 June DIYs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click on each image to go to the project.
All photos copyright of their respective sites unless otherwise noted.

0

DIY Geometric Sunhat

 

It’s already May, and I’ve been a planting fool! But unfortunately, I’ve also already been sunburned once. Despite my daily layer of sunscreen, I’m realizing I need something more – like an gigantic hat to protect my face, neck, and scalp. (Having super dark hair and a flaky scalp do not mix.) I picked up a wide-brimmed straw hat for the job, but decided it needed a bit more personality. A few geometric shapes and three primary colors later and now I’ll be wearing it all summer long! Bonus: this one is foldable, so it’ll be easy to tuck into my bag on the go – no excuses.

 

 

Supplies:
• wide-brimmed straw hat
• craft paint
• cardstock
• scissors
• pen
• flat-tipped paintbrush
• palette or paper plate
• paper towels

 

 

Start out by making some simple cutout templates using the cardstock, pen, and scissors. I used objects from around the house – a salt cellar for the circle, a sticker for the square, and the corner of the cardstock for the triangle. (Of course you can opt to use any shapes you want, I think black and white squiggles would look great!) I recommend using a pen to trace each shape because a pencil didn’t seem to be dark enough.

 

 

Lay out your shapes and trace as you go, making sure to avoid placing circle next to circle, etc. Now get to painting. I chose a primary color palette because it’s bright and fun for summer, but I think a black and white scheme would be just as striking. Layer of paper towels or newsprint on your painting surface before getting started because it will come through a bit. After putting some paint on my palette, I went around and made a small daub of color on each shape as a guide.

 

 

Carefully line the edges of each shape using your flat-tipped brush before filling in the centers, using the brush in an up and down motion to get all the nooks and crannies where necessary. Allow your new hat to dry thoroughly (of course) before strutting your stuff and protecting your mug!

 

0

Hippin’ + Hoppin’

DIY Bath Salt Easter Egg Bombs // DIY Easter Mood Eggs // DIY Happy Easter Banner

My default decor for Easter is fresh flowers and dyed eggs, aside from a big meal with family I don’t have a lot of tradition surrounding the holiday. Maybe that will change one day if I have a child, but in the meantime I love the few things I know I can count on being present. But if you’re hosting, looking for creative ideas to decorate eggs, or curious about treats for baskets check out the nineteen ideas we’ve rounded up!

 

DIY Modern Brushstroke Easter Eggs // DIY Paper Carrot Treat Box // DIY Swedish Easter Wall Hanging // Easter Bark

 

Mini DIY Easter Bouquets // DIY Pastel Egg Easter Soap // Rosé Creme Filled Marbled Eggs // DIY Dyed Robin Eggs

 

DIY Egg Vase Centerpiece // DIY Hologram Galaxy Easter Eggs // DIY Monochrome Eggs // DIY Sprinkle Easter Eggs

 

DIY Illustrated Eggshell Centerpiece // Easter Printables // Natural Tea Dyed Easter Eggs // Printable Easter Bunny Treat Cones

1

DIY Pencil Eraser Pattern Art

 

Last month was a whirlwind, so we’re doubling down on DIY art projects in April – here’s the first. I want to bring the joy and carelessness of art class back with these projects, in other words nothing complicated and lot of free spiritedness. We can all remember using a pencil’s eraser to create a stamp, but today we’re using one to paint!

 

 

I love using household items to create, and with a pencil there’s no worry about messing it up because you can simply throw it away when finished if you’d like. Like all of our art DIYs this one is fast and loose, stick to a pattern if you’d like or be more abstract. Go monotone with one color or use the whole rainbow.

 

 

Supplies
canvas panel, I used an 8″ x 10″
• craft paint
• pencil with fresh eraser
• palette or paper plate

 

 

I started by eyeballing the center of the canvas and creating the middle square that’s twelve dots wide by twelve tall, but if you’re not the greatest at visualizing measurements just get out your ruler and measure to find the middle. All of the other squares were built off of that initial shape and the number of dots used. With each dip of my eraser in the paint I was able to create about three dots before having to reload, so some of them are more opaque than others. I didn’t pay too much attention to keeping super straight columns and rows, and in hindsight I actually wish it had turned out a bit more carefree. This DIY was really cathartic because I loved the mindless repetition.

 

1