Nicholas Rougeux

 

Chicago-based self-taught web developer and artist Nicholas Rougeux did something rather remarkable, he took the scores of classical composers and turned them into wonderfully colorful fractal images. In fact, he created the entire process and you can see the visuals take shape as each piece is played here.

Each dot represents a note in the score. Pitch is indicated by the distance from the center of the image, while the time at which the note occurs is given by the angle from the 12 o’clock position. The size of the dot indicates the duration of the note, and the color of the dot is different for each instrument.

Shop Nicholas Rougeux’s prints

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Phoebe Cummings

 

There are so many things I love about Phoebe Cummings‘ sculptures. She primarily works with greenware – AKA unfired clay – and other supportive elements to create these pieces that are built on site and will only last as long as their respective exhibition. Because Cummings’ sculptures are the natural color of the clay they look as though they’d be right at home adorning an immaculate mausoleum.

 

 

 

 

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Emma Hartvig

 

Paris-based Swedish photographer Emma Hartvig has a way behind the camera that makes every shot seem right out of a glamorous Hollywood film. Her staging capabilities are impeccable, as are the narratives she strives to capture within each project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Roger Vail

 

Amusement parks and carnivals are two of my favorite things – the energy, the smells, and the people-watching all combine for the perfect summer adventure! Roger Vail started photographing their thrill rides with his 8 x 10-inch view camera back in 1970, his pictures made in the evening hours with long exposure times. The result of these extended moments, which track the momentum of the ride, offer up the childlike sense of wonderment that keeps me going back year after year for more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Camille Walala / WALALA x PLAY

 

Over the past few years we’ve seen the resurgence of the Memphis Movement and last September Camille Walala brought her spin to WALALA x PLAY, her latest project at London’s NOW Gallery. The colorful, graphic labyrinth encourages visitors to unleash their inner child while leading them towards a puzzle where they’re asked to find the differences between similar images. Walala’s influences also include the Ndebele tribe and optical art master Vasarely, as well as the simple desire to put a smile on people’s faces.

 

 

 

 

Photos by Charles Emerson

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Havoc Hendricks

 

Havoc Hendricks is inspired by minimalism, both as a way of life as it concerns aesthetics. His art focuses on the complex patterns that can be found through nature viewed through a minimalist’s perspective. This so-called “detailed minimalism” translates incredibly well through Hendricks’ paintings – make sure you check out the moons and geodes.

 

 

 

 

 

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Annyen Lam

 

If you’ve ever brandished an X-Acto knife you know how unwieldy they can be, and just how much practice it takes to guide the blade with precision. Annyen Lam is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Toronto whose practice includes cut paper work, installation, lithography, screen printing, and book arts. The pieces seen here combine two of her talents – cut paper and lithography.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dane Lovett

 

There’s not a lot of information to be found about Australian artist Dane Lovett, but all I need to know is that I like what I see in his work – particularly the pieces centered around plant-life. His latest is a series of two-color ultra-violet paintings that simultaneously make me think of greenhouses and backlights.

 

 

 

 

 

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Ray Pettibon

 

If the name Ray Pettibon sounds familiar to you, there may be a few reasons why:
1. His association with his brother’s band, Black Flag. He not only named them but designed the distinctive four bar logo.
2. His album cover artwork, like Sonic Youth’s Goo.
3. His prominence in the early 1980s in the southern California punk rock scene.

From an art perspective, Pettibon is known for his comic-like illustrations, usually done in India ink on paper, that often include violent or anti-authoritarian subject matter. In later years he’s also used collage in his works. I’m especially drawn to this collection of surf culture illustrations that was on display at Venus over Manhattan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jill Bliss / Nature Medleys

 

Jill Bliss has committed her days to studying and creating in the Salish Sea islands of Canada and Washington. She’s bought a parcel of land and plans to build a homestead on it to use as home base as she explores the Cascadia bioregion. And while Bliss explores it all, I’m partial to her Nature Medleys series – the temporary arrangement of mushrooms and plants that she then photographs.

Shop Jill Bliss’ work

 

 

 

 

 

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