Philip Govedare

 

Philip Govedare‘s interpretation of our many landscapes are compelling and beautiful. The light, color, texture, and atmosphere he brings to each helps give meaning to each place.

My work is both a response to and an interpretation of the world, but it also imparts sentiment through projection that comes from a perspective of anxiety about the condition of landscape and nature in our world today. I endeavor to create a fictional response to an observed phenomenon, a metaphor that is infused with a blend of celebration, apprehension and doubt about our place in the natural world. In this manner, this work may allude to the past and simultaneously project into the future.

 

 

 

 

 

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āsum

 

āsum‘s line of bags are the definition of effortless style. Creative, practical, casual yet with great lines. Project Runway alum Angela Sum’s draped bags are made of soft linens, washed cottons, and full grain leathers, and each one is manufactured ethically. I love the artful look each one could bring to any outfit.

 

 

 

 

 

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Melinda Schawel

 

I love it when an artist allows the act of making to guide their creations. Melinda Schawel does through the use of paper and wood in a manually intensive process. Her strict palette of neutral tones accented by reds and yellows helps to strike a balance between control and chaos. The tension created by each “entity” creates undeniable tension and harmony.

 

 

 

 

 

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Plume

 

Routers seem to be the main cause of WiFi frustration. They only work when placed in the so-called perfect spot and aren’t equipped to handle the needs of a busy home full of tech. Plume puts the router in the cloud, adapting in real-time to the devices and habits in your home. With a small Plume pod in each room you can now work, play, listen, and connect everywhere with a strong signal.

 

 

 

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Amélie Fontaine

 

Amélie Fontaine‘s illustrations make me smile. Her universe is made up of a mysterious and half-dreamed natural history, a strange universe that often includes animals and silent stories told in the form of step-by-step instructions. All I know is that I’d happily move in tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Louise Jewell

 

UK-based illustrator Louise Jewell studied and designed fashion knitwear before turning to illustration. I’m so drawn to the seafaring characters she creates right along with their furry companions. If you pay attention you can also see the obvious influences of prints, patterns, textiles, and fashion. Plenty of Louise’s work is for sale in her shop if you’d like to own it, too.

 

 

 

 

 

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Jacqueline Smith

 

Australian illustrator Jacqueline Smith, who also uses the pseudonym Auf Wiedersehen, combines pencil and watercolor to create lovely and mysterious women. Most hide behind their hair and reside in what can only be imagined as somewhere between dreamland and outer space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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#365quotes2016 + Mixbook

 

2016 was the second time I completed my 365 quotes project on Instagram, and it would be a shame not to document it after all the time put in. So I teamed up with the creative folks over at Mixbook to help make it a reality in the form of a hardcover photobook that I can have as a longtime reminder.

 

 

After deciding on a square 8.5 x 8.5″ photobook I chose to start with one of Mixbook’s templates – Minimal White – rather than work from an entirely blank slate. The platform is really simple to use and allowed me to change page layouts and fonts once I began, as well as add pages (up to 399). There’s also the option to add things like stickers and backgrounds to further customize your project, so all-in-all you have complete control over your design.

 

 

Each page of my photobook has the same vertical off-center layout because I wanted all 365 quotes to have the same weight and presence with the exception of the cover. This seemed like the obvious choice since they were all the same shape when initially shared on Instagram and I wanted to retain that integrity.

 

 

I was also happy to learn that Mixbook uses only the highest quality heavy-weight papers that are ethically sourced from sustainable forests and certified by the Forest Stewardship Council and the Rainforest Alliance. Huge bonus!

The end result is just as I hoped it would be, clean and minimal with each quote stealing the show from the page before. (Now what else can I make a book of?)

 

 

This post sponsored by Mixbook. All words and opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that help Design Crush create fresh content!

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DIY Abstract Embroidery Hoop Art

 

Welcome to our second new series of 2017! After nearly ten years of sharing the creativity of others, I thought it was high time we started creating more ourselves. These projects are just as much for me as they are for you. Working in a creative industry tends to have the opposite effect of what you might expect, and my own personal art has taken a backseat. I aim to change that starting with this post.

So, what can you expect? A loosely guided art project once a month that leaves plenty of room to explore and make your own. I’ll share my own take on it and leave you to the rest with a list of supplies and your own hands.

 

 

 

Supplies
• embroidery hoop(s)
• embroidery fabric
• acrylic paints
• palette knife (a disposable plastic knife will do in a pinch)
• acrylic paint brush
• jar with water for rinsing
• paper towels
• paint palette (or paper plate)
• scissors

 

 

I began by finding two color palettes I liked that could be easily mixed and matched – mainly blues, corals, goldenrod, and grey. I also knew that I wanted my three hoops to be related in style to look cohesive when hung together, and I accomplished that in two ways. First I made sure to use colors from the first two pieces together in the third, and second I made each painting slightly more organized in style than the previous. (Can you tell the order?)

 

 

Begin by disassembling the embroidery hoop and stretching the embroidery fabric over the inner hoop before pulling the fabric taut and replacing and tightening the outer hoop. I waited until the end of the project to trim off excess fabric from the back, but you could do that now as well.

Next you’ll want to pick up that paint brush and paint the entire “canvas” background however you see fit, making sure to paint over the top edge of the embroidery hoop as well. (Sidenote: this is the only time I used a brush throughout)

 

 

After the background is dry it’s time to put that palette knife to work. Squeeze each of your chosen paint colors onto your palette, and if you’re mixing a new color remember that it’s always better to mix too much than too little because it’ll be nearly impossible to recreate that color again. Load up the underside of the knife with a dollop of paint and use it as though you’re icing a cake. I didn’t bother waiting for colors to dry in between, just used a gentle hand to avoid mixing. The paint should be thick enough on the fabric that you can see definition, no need to refrain.

 

 

Once finished I let these guys hang out for a solid 24-hours to dry. Those thick layers of paint will take at least that long to set up fully. I then used some small finishing nails to hang them on the wall, just under each hoop closure.

I hope you love this new series and will join me in bringing more creativity into your life! And if you complete any of the projects I’d love to see – just tag @designcrush.

 

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