Megan Krzmarzick

 

Portland-based abstract artist Megan Krzmarzick uses dramatic, bold colors and textures to get her point across and express deep and resonating emotions and energies.

Through her work, Megan explores healing and identity, the reality of time and beings in flux, and competing narratives that weave in and out of our lives shaping different forms and frames of reality. She is the author of a hand painted poetry zine “Running Away from Home,” a small press publication carried at Powell’s Books. Megan also leads creative workshops as the founder of “Humanities Dept.”

 

 

 

0

Print Edition: January 2019

All This And More by Jessica Hische

 

Anthony Bourdain by Lewis Rossignol Art

 

Forest by Jean Jullien

 

Gentlemen by DEF Prints Co.

 

Gilmore Girls by Sprout Jam

 

I’m Vegan by Ashley Percival

 

Mid-Century Modern Art Print by Gallery J9

 

Pinky Swear by Jazzberry Blue

 

Tom Waits Cassettes by The Word Association

 

Tundra by In a Pale Place

0

Print Edition: December 2018

Give the Joy Back by Anthony Burrill

 

Beetle Bug Folk Art by Maggie Magoo Designs

 

Circulation by Kelly Ventura

 

Cubicle Sweet Cubicle by Yardsale Press

 

Do It Anyway 2 by Kristi Kohut

 

Head and Hand 01 by Wit & Delight Shop

 

Morse Code Sign by Magnolia

 

Pomme Print by Cosas Minimas

 

Tropical Plants by Kimberley Dhollander

 

Wes Anderson Alphabet Poster by Abbie Illustrations

0

Katie McCann

 

Katie McCann‘s intricately cut and pieced together collages appear to be antique, vintage, and forgotten though they’re far from it. The creatures she creates are from a childhood world of faeries, witches, science fiction, and botany living in their own unique habitat. I’d rather like to have a conversation with each of them.

Shop Katie McCann’s work

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Lisa Vanin

 

Lisa Vanin‘s paintings combine the natural world with a touch of the macabre, usually through the presence of a snake or a skull or three. Each piece sets a melancholy tone that leaves me wondering more about the circumstances surrounding it all. Don’t miss Vanin’s (super affordable) ceramic snakes or metal pins either.

Shop Lisa Vanin’s work

 

 

 

 

 

0

Tin Can Forest

 

If you’re at all fascinated with the occult – whether just during the month of October or more – have a look at the work of Tin Can Forest. Canadian artists and publishers Pat Shewchuk and Marek Colek work collaboratively to create art, video installations, films, and books inspired by the the forests of Canada, Slavic art, and occult folklore. Their pieces are darkly beautiful with stories to tell.

Shop the work of Tin Can Forest

 

 

 

 

 

2

Yu Maeda

 

Artist Yu Maeda was born in Kumamoto, Japan and now calls Southern California home. Subjects like skulls, knives, brains, and blood usually have a sinister air about them, but Maeda’s brightly colored, gape-mouthed creatures seem way too energetic and happy for any of that nonsense!

Shop Yu Maeda’s work

 

 

 

 

 

0

Alberto Ortega

 

Alberto Ortega‘s landscape paintings depict homes and streets where people live their everyday lives, though their presence is only hinted at through parked cars and glowing windows.

As an immigrant to the United States, I am intrigued by American suburban life as depicted in film, literature, and visual art. Through the images I create of American homes, buildings, and man-made environments, I seek to portray society and some of its contradictions. These scenes represent hopes and dreams, the threat of their failure, and alienation. I hope that my paintings set a stage that allows a drama to play out within the viewer.

Shop Alberto Ortega’s work

 

 

 

 

0