Kristen Meyer

 

When my mind feels jumbled up I like to search out things that are all sorted out, that’s how I came upon the work of Kristen Meyer. Her background runs the gamut from floral design to interior decorating to window design and prop styling, and she puts them all to use when creating these organized geometric flat lays out of themed groupings.

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Huntz Liu

 

Los Angeles-based Huntz Liu is a Taiwanese-American artist who mainly works with hand-cut paper. Through layering and perspective he manages to create pieces that look like 3D sculptures.

 

 

 

 

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Habitat Legit AKA Colin Quest

 

Habitat Legit, aka Colin Quest, is a digital collage artist based in Melbourne, Australia. He draws inspiration from the architecture and desert landscapes of Palm Springs then pairs them with the bold color palettes of Mexico. Photos of different textured walls and flora are deconstructed and manipulated digitally to produce his desert fresh collages.

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Lisa Courtney

 

Massachusetts-based painter Lisa Courtney considers herself an abstract expressionist, meaning her interpretations include things that are recognizable, placing her style somewhere between realism and abstractionism. The colorfully serene scenes she captures are directly from her surroundings – seaside cottages, sunsets, and more.

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Nicholas Rougeux

 

Chicago-based self-taught web developer and artist Nicholas Rougeux did something rather remarkable, he took the scores of classical composers and turned them into wonderfully colorful fractal images. In fact, he created the entire process and you can see the visuals take shape as each piece is played here.

Each dot represents a note in the score. Pitch is indicated by the distance from the center of the image, while the time at which the note occurs is given by the angle from the 12 o’clock position. The size of the dot indicates the duration of the note, and the color of the dot is different for each instrument.

Shop Nicholas Rougeux’s prints

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Annyen Lam

 

If you’ve ever brandished an X-Acto knife you know how unwieldy they can be, and just how much practice it takes to guide the blade with precision. Annyen Lam is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Toronto whose practice includes cut paper work, installation, lithography, screen printing, and book arts. The pieces seen here combine two of her talents – cut paper and lithography.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Emma-Leone Palmer / Paint Play Series

 

Emma-Leone Palmer paints faces, but what she strives to capture are the deep wells of feeling and emotion that run beneath the surface of their expressions. Her latest work, the Paint Play series, uses paint, lube, glitter, and water, the mediums smeared, dripped, flicked, and splashed onto the subject’s face to trigger reactions and emotions. It’s not premeditated, rather hundreds of photos are taken and the paintings made as a result.

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Samuel Shumway

 

Samuel Shumway is a stop motion animator, videographer, prop designer, and fabricator (whew) based in NYC. He sculpts these delectable little meals entirely out of paper, snipping and folding until every little bit is just so. Anyone hungry for pancakes all of a sudden??

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lisa Nilsson / Tissue Series

 

Lisa Nilsson‘s Tissue Series is crafted entirely from mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books, each anatomical cross-section quilled to detailed perfection. Check out the detail in the last image below to get a better idea of what goes into even a small section of work. (Seems satisfying, doesn’t it?)

They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who are said to have made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time. I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.

 

 

 

 

 

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