Then and Now

 

My Mom is my everything. My best friend, my sounding board, my ride or die. The one who gives me tough love when I need it and tells me to be gentle with myself when the days are hard. We’ve always been close, but it was only once we no longer lived in the same house that I began to appreciate the things that once annoyed me. The way she always put me first, how fiercely protective she can be, and even the amount of discipline she instilled in the way she raised me.

 

1981

My mom was made to be a mother, my mother. She had me at a young 22 years old, but was wise beyond her years after some difficult family circumstances early on in life. But once she gave birth she never really looked back – we went everywhere together, did everything, and were sidekicks. We still are.

 

2015

I wanted to give her something extra special this Mother’s Day, something that represents how we began and how far we’ve come as mother and daughter as well as friends. I chose two of Artifact Uprising‘s Instagram Friendly frames, each of them measures 8 x 10″ and is deep set with a gorgeous walnut finish. In the first she’s holding a one and half year old me in her arms at my cousin’s baptism, and in the second we’re crouching in together at Mother’s Day brunch two years ago.

 

 

Both of these photos were already in my Instagram feed, so I only had to connect the channel and voila – no uploading necessary. I know these two museum quality frames will be something my Mom cherishes for years to come, and I love that we can add to them in the future with more shots of the two of us!

This post sponsored by Artifact Uprising. All words and opinions are my own, as always. Thank you for supporting the brands that help keep Design Crush creating fresh content! Enjoy 10% off your order through May 9th with code AUxMOTHERDAY17.

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Annika Von Hausswolff

 

You guys, I have warm weather on my mind in a big way. Yesterday I moved half of my indoor plants outside (onto my covered front porch in case of a late frost) and bought two peony roots to plant. Annika Von Hausswolff‘s photography makes me think of junior high summers, hanging out at the public pool with my best friend, listening to Top 40 music, and gossiping about boys. All good things.

 

 

 

 

 

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Ward Roberts / Courts

 

Ward RobertsCourts 01 and Courts 02 series is a tribute to his childhood spent in Hong Kong, playing basketball outdoors with other youth. Roberts’ photography captures the juxtaposition of stark concrete apartment buildings against soft pastel tones and open empty spaces.

 

 

 

 

 

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Pete Johnson / A to Z

 

Pete Johnson travels globally working with nonprofits and NGOs, photographing different cultures and subjects as he travels and works on humanitarian projects. In his latest project, A to Z, Pete’s collected some of his most powerful images and designating them to a corresponding letter. The resulting alphabet pairs graphic design with photography to create some truly dynamic images.

 

 

 

 

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Grant Legassick / Urban Etchings

 

Grant Legassick‘s Urban Etchings are in a league of their own. By taking multiple photos and layering them overtop one another – similar to a double exposure – Legassick creates the illusion of a pencil drawing or etching. Each city street turns into a story with its own flow and imagined movement.

 

 

 

 

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Loes Heerink / Vendors from Above

 

The lives of street vendors are fascinating and a bit mysterious. Photographer Loes Heerink captured Hanoi’s vending scene, aptly named Vendors from Above, oftentimes standing atop the city’s bridges for hours in wait of the perfect shot. Their bicycles packed high with fruits, vegetables, and flowers, each vender wakes at 4am and pedals miles per day selling her goods. Heerink is currently selling a book of the series through her site.

 

 

 

 

 

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Frances Berry

 

Frances Berry‘s photographs could almost feel all too familiar if you didn’t notice something… off. Berry seeks to “create alternatives to the traditional snapshot that reinforce rather than destroy our internal visualization of time so that one may revisit a moment in a more authentic and meaningful way”. Her mastery of not only photography but digital manipulation make a powerful combination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Print Edition: February 2017

Composition 505 by Chad Wys

 

Lune Watercolor and Ink Original by Louet Folk

 

Never Let Me Go by Henn Kim

 

On Moth’s Wings by Lauren Blair

 

T.S. Eliot Quote by Old English Co.

 

Orange Flower Fleurs by Sébastien Bouvier

 

The Neighbors by Home of DODO

 

The World is Your Oyster by Sugar Paper

 

We Welcome All Letterpress Poster by OKO Gallery

 

Vertical Cactus by Fox Hollow Design Co.

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