Francesca Pasquali

 

Francesca Pasquali transforms plastic industrial materials into objects and installations that emulate natural shapes and structures that she’s observed. Her art includes everything from drinking straws to balloons to neoprene, and dozens more interesting materials in between. Be sure and have a look at Pasquali’s entire portfolio to see the extent for yourself!

 

 

 

 

 

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Camille Walala / WALALA x PLAY

 

Over the past few years we’ve seen the resurgence of the Memphis Movement and last September Camille Walala brought her spin to WALALA x PLAY, her latest project at London’s NOW Gallery. The colorful, graphic labyrinth encourages visitors to unleash their inner child while leading them towards a puzzle where they’re asked to find the differences between similar images. Walala’s influences also include the Ndebele tribe and optical art master Vasarely, as well as the simple desire to put a smile on people’s faces.

 

 

 

 

Photos by Charles Emerson

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Dan Stockholm / By Hand

 

For Dan Stockholm‘s By Hand installation he created a series of negative plaster casts of his cupped hands into red clay bricks that reveal different amounts of his palms. The project is a follow up to a project from 2013 that followed his father’s death…

Fascinated by places and architecture with an innate historical significance and narrative tension, Dan Stockholm practises a ‘creative archaeology’. The act of touching has become a fundamental part of his working process where for example, in 2013 days after his father’s death he methodically touched his father’s entire house centimetre by centimetre and subsequently made and adapted plaster casts of his handprints for ongoing sculptures and installations.

 

 

 

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Sarah Greaves

 

A vibrant installation of ancient Armenian images, embroidered wooden scupltures, zoomorphic creatures, and soundscapes. A collection that uses embroidery to vandalize everyday objects with emotive, political, and thoughtful text. A pseudo kitchen where fridges, doors, food, and sinks become the canvases for hidden thoughts. Sarah Greaves elevates everything she touches to the next level of thought and emotion.

 

 

 

 

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The Mattress Factory

Vanessa German, sometimes. we. cannot. be. with. our. bodies., 2017

This past weekend I visited the Mattress Factory here in Pittsburgh for the first time in years. The non-traditional museum was founded in 1977 in an old mattress factory by artists to support artists, working in residence to create site-specific installations. Since then the museum has presented and commissioned new installation and performance works by more than 750 artists, and grown to take up three buildings in the city’s Mexican War Streets neighborhood. The museum supports established and emerging artists through a residency program that provides leadership, guidance, resources, and opportunities to create artwork that is unconventional, challenging and thought-provoking. The flexibility and inventiveness offered allows artists to respond to developments in technology, explore audience interaction, and challenge traditional artistic ideals and practices.

 

Dennis Maher, A Second Home, 2016

 

Dennis Maher, A Second Home, 2016

 

Dennis Maher, A Second Home, 2016

 

Dennis Maher, A Second Home, 2016

 

Dennis Maher, A Second Home, 2016

 

Vanessa German, sometimes. we. cannot. be. with. our. bodies., 2017

 

Vanessa German, sometimes. we. cannot. be. with. our. bodies., 2017

 

David Pohl, furniture music, 2017

 

David Pohl, furniture music, 2017

 

David Pohl, furniture music, 2017

 

 

William Anastasi, Untitled (Calisthenic Series), 1997

 

Vanessa Sica and Chris Kasabach, Unbrella, 2009

 

Allan Wexler, Bed Sitting Rooms for an Artist in Residence, 1988

 

David Ellis, Summer Quintet #17, 2017

 

Jene Highstein, Untitled, 1986

 

Bill Woodrow, Ship of Fools: Discovery of Time, 1986

 

Sarah Oppenheimer, 610-3356, 2008

 

Meg Webster, Solar Grow Room, 2017

 

Meg Webster, Solar Grow Room, 2017

 

Allan Wexler, Sculpting Gravity​, 2017

 

Allan Wexler, Sculpting Gravity​, 2017

 

Allan Wexler, Sculpting Gravity​, 2017

 

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Dots, 1996

 

Yayoi Kusama, Repetitive Vision, 1996

 

James Turrell, Catso, Red, 1994

 

Rolf Julius, Red, 1996

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Ian Brill

 

Ian Brill, NYC native and Pittsburgh resident, creates installations that focus on the accumulation of form through process. Through the creation of interactive, performative, and multi-sensorial environments, he considers the boundaries of becoming and our relationship with technology. His installations, performances, and writing have been presented internationally, at conferences, festivals museums and galleries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Lost Object

 

One man’s trash being another’s treasure very well may be The Lost Object‘s favorite phrase. The anonymous artist works with discarded and abandoned materials to create installations and sculptures through a zen process where nothing is set in stone except achieving balance and harmony.

I make stuff from junk. I pick up messes and try to make them into something I think looks good. I use the junk from the city, I use the stuff from the field, I use the bits in the forest, and the things in the trash. I hunt, I collect, I gather, but only what I need for the work, for the play. Color, shape, composition. Some lost stuff gets found again.

 

 

 

 

 

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Terry Haggerty / In Between Elements

 

Doesn’t Terry Haggerty‘s In Between Elements make you want to run your hands all over it? All of those 2D curves and edges in the installation are a great example of the trompe-l’oeil, or the interplay between reality and illusion, that artist’s are always experimenting with.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Christina Graham / Ridgewood Reflections

 

Christina Graham‘s paintings are intriguing, and her Ridgewood Reflections site-specific installation in a DIY space in Queens, New York this past summer is both bright and curious.

The walls and molding are Agnes Martin variations on white paint, caked on from years of layering, a radiator, mirrored closet doors. Everything in the room has character — a sort of proud outer-borough minimalism.

It seemed important to respond directly to the space and not pretend it’s a white cube. I used the windows, doors and radiators as armatures, but let textures from my day-to-day seep in. The mirror and concrete sculptures are supporting acts for the paintings, a way to see the room from unexpected vantage points.

 

 

 

 

 

via Juxtapoz

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Rowan Mersh

 

Rowan Mersh is a multi-media sculptor epitomised by his ability to take ordinary materials and transform them into the extraordinary. From textile sculptures to kinetic and interactive installations, Mersh’s pieces bridge the realms of art, design, and fashion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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