44 Halloweeny Things

Apple Cider Crullers // Black Branch Wreath // Brown Butter Bourbon Caramel Apples // DIY Colorful Halloween Wreath

 

Death Eater Negroni Cocktail // DIY Boo Halloween Treat Bags // DIY Eames Print Pumpkins // DIY Modern Painted Pumpkins

 

DIY Gold Botanical Pattern Pumpkins // DIY Pastel Pumpkin Faces // DIY Witch Silhouette Decor // Skull Ring

 

Gilded Insect Cookies // Glass Orb with Brass Base // Sugar Skull Plates // Marie Coupe Smoke Grey Cocktail Glass

 

DIY Miniature Haunted Houses // Moon Garland // Palmistry Brooch // Red Velvet Skeleton Cake

 

Gold Skull Figurine // Spooky Black-and-White Russian Cocktails // The Eel Charmer Cocktail // Carved Wood Raven

 

Apple Spice + Bourbon Flip Cocktail // Dark Purple Edison Bulb String Lights // DIY Black Flower Halloween Wreath // Black Widow Berry Cocktail

 

DIY Concrete Pumpkins // DIY Monster Pinatas // DIY Jade Pumpkins // DIY Paper Bag Portrait Luminaries

 

DIY Sassy Trick or Treat Bags // Easy Pumpkin Bread Rolls // Eyeball Orbs // Gilded Skeleton Canister

 

Brushed Gold Skull Punch Bowl // Lantern Candle Holder // Melting Monster Halloween Punch (Non-Alcoholic) // Monster Eye-Scream Cookies

 

DIY Painted Party Pumpkins // Pomegranate + Blackberry Lemon Drop Cocktail // Sketched Skull Plates // Slow-Cooker Spiked Mulled Cider

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A Book That Takes It’s Time

 

A Book That Takes Its Time is one I’ve been waiting to get my hands on since the start of the year when I first learned of its upcoming existence. Finally today, thanks to the team at Workman Publishing, I’m able to share it with you on its release date!

Flow is a magazine celebrating creativity, imperfection, and life’s little pleasures and this is its first companion book. It also embraces the physical qualities of paper – its weight, texture, the way it takes color – and the formats and ways in which it can be delivered. Articles in the magazine mingle with bound-in or fold-out posters, stickers, pre-printed thank you cards from noted illustrators, and other “goodies.” In short, Flow has created a magazine best enjoyed in print form and A Book That Takes Its Time follows closely in its successful footsteps.

 

 

A Book That Takes Its Time: An Unhurried Adventure in Creative Mindfulness (the full title) was penned by the co-founders and creative directors of Flow, Irene Smit and Astrid Van der Hulst. At it’s heart this tome is about doing, about experience, and about intention. It’s a book both about mindfulness and a book that literally inspires mindfulness while reminding readers to slow down, breathe deeply, and be present.

 

 

I don’t know about you, but I’m forever struggling to be more in tune with the now – maybe this year more than ever before. This book turned out to be a much needed balm, right from Chapter 1, that I can turn to when the days are especially trying or I just need a moment to regroup and regain focus. Make your way through its pages in order or skip around depending on what you need and when you need it.

 

 

Learn to appreciate and savor moments both large and small by punching out pages of decorative memory cards to fill out and save in a mason jar so you can revisit them when you need an emotional lift. Read about the benefits of clearing your mind and letting your hands lead the way, then use the provided images and words to create a personal collage. Snip, arrange, and paste them onto the fold-out blank canvas and see where your subconscious takes you.

 

 

Read about the advantages of slowing down, then put those lessons into practice with the removable Joy of One Thing at a Time Notebook. Tear out a postcard and snail mail it to a friend. Make a list to clear your mind and refocus.

 

 

There are lessons on how to shift your focus away from what you don’t have and focus on what you do have. On stepping back from your phone to take just one photo with a camera – and then let the gaps in an album tell the story. Even tips for breaking old habits that will get your wheels turning.

 

 

Not every page is an activity or lesson, some are simply filled with inspiring words that you may not have known you needed to read. Do you get it? It’s the kind of book that makes you take your time, one that you can’t just hurry through so like so many other things in life. It’s a book that makes you stop to savor, play with, and appreciate all the lovely and interesting detours that hands-on activities provide.

 

 

 

Readers will have the chance to learn hand-lettering, the basics of collaging, even how to meditate while running. There’s something for everyone, which is what I love most about this book that mixes reading, learning, and doing. It’s part creative therapy, part teacher, part self-help, part workshop.

 

 

 

 

 

This post sponsored by Workman Publishing. All words and opinions are my own, as always. Thank you for supporting the brands that keep Design Crush creating fresh content!

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10 June DIYs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click on each image to go to the project.
All photos copyright of their respective sites unless otherwise noted.

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DIY Geometric Sunhat

 

It’s already May, and I’ve been a planting fool! But unfortunately, I’ve also already been sunburned once. Despite my daily layer of sunscreen, I’m realizing I need something more – like an gigantic hat to protect my face, neck, and scalp. (Having super dark hair and a flaky scalp do not mix.) I picked up a wide-brimmed straw hat for the job, but decided it needed a bit more personality. A few geometric shapes and three primary colors later and now I’ll be wearing it all summer long! Bonus: this one is foldable, so it’ll be easy to tuck into my bag on the go – no excuses.

 

 

Supplies:
• wide-brimmed straw hat
• craft paint
• cardstock
• scissors
• pen
• flat-tipped paintbrush
• palette or paper plate
• paper towels

 

 

Start out by making some simple cutout templates using the cardstock, pen, and scissors. I used objects from around the house – a salt cellar for the circle, a sticker for the square, and the corner of the cardstock for the triangle. (Of course you can opt to use any shapes you want, I think black and white squiggles would look great!) I recommend using a pen to trace each shape because a pencil didn’t seem to be dark enough.

 

 

Lay out your shapes and trace as you go, making sure to avoid placing circle next to circle, etc. Now get to painting. I chose a primary color palette because it’s bright and fun for summer, but I think a black and white scheme would be just as striking. Layer of paper towels or newsprint on your painting surface before getting started because it will come through a bit. After putting some paint on my palette, I went around and made a small daub of color on each shape as a guide.

 

 

Carefully line the edges of each shape using your flat-tipped brush before filling in the centers, using the brush in an up and down motion to get all the nooks and crannies where necessary. Allow your new hat to dry thoroughly (of course) before strutting your stuff and protecting your mug!

 

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