Josie Lewis

 

Multidisciplinary artist Josie Lewis creates works that make me – and I’m guessing lots of others – insanely happy! Winding trails of graduated colored circles that travel over and under themselves on their journey, abstract moments caught forever in resin that remind me of the prettiest petri dishes, and so much more.

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Katie McCann

 

Katie McCann‘s intricately cut and pieced together collages appear to be antique, vintage, and forgotten though they’re far from it. The creatures she creates are from a childhood world of faeries, witches, science fiction, and botany living in their own unique habitat. I’d rather like to have a conversation with each of them.

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Dessie Jackson

 

Los Angeles-based artist Dessie Jackson rotates between using mixed media, painting, and paper to create her wildly expressive portraits. With a swoosh of paint around the eyes or a whirlwind of color around a mouth, Jackson turns the everyday into the questionably extraordinary.

 

 

 

 

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Rachel Sager

 

San Francisco-based artist Rachel Sager‘s newest series focuses on sweeping, explosive landscapes where matter is presented in a decomposed state, suspended between earth and sky. Her inspiration for these charcoal and oil paintings comes from brush fires, demolition explosions, storm clouds, and explosives.

“My goal is to produce the differences existing between the varying states of this matter, neither solid or gas, yet so specific that a rain cloud could never be mistaken for a cloud consisting of particles that once made up a house or a building. In doing so, I aim to create sweeping, emotionally charged landscapes that convey a dissonance that I experience in self expression. The turmoil, represented by the debris filled smoke, is juxtaposed by sun infused skies and cirrus clouds, projecting the duplicity that is unavoidable, overwhelming, and at times, awe-inspiring.”

 

 

 

 

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Alma Haser

 

Alma Haser was born into an artistic family in the Black Forest, Germany and is now based in London. Known for her complex and meticulous portraits, she creates striking work that expands the idea of traditional portrait photography. Alma takes her photographs further with paper-folding techniques, collage, and mixed media to blur the distinction between 2D and 3D imagery.

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Minas Halaj / Floral Minds

 

Feeling very inspired by artist Minas Halaj‘s Floral Minds series, which he explains so well below.

“The concept of beauty is a burdened one. We are living in a society that fears its adoration in contemporary art, yet intimidates its women into accepting it as their highest value. We have degraded it in mass media and the celebrity yet revere it above all other qualities of life. Beauty is a double edged sword an instrument of seduction and inaccessibility burdened sword an overwhelming distrust in the simple sensation of pleasure.”

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Habitat Legit AKA Colin Quest

 

Habitat Legit, aka Colin Quest, is a digital collage artist based in Melbourne, Australia. He draws inspiration from the architecture and desert landscapes of Palm Springs then pairs them with the bold color palettes of Mexico. Photos of different textured walls and flora are deconstructed and manipulated digitally to produce his desert fresh collages.

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Gala Bent

 

Gala Bent is a Seattle-based drawing-centric painter who also dabbles in installations, animations, and collaborations. The series partially seen here – Particle Playlist – is probably my favorite in her portfolio, I love how each piece stands strong on its own but also adds to the group as a whole.

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Karin Miller

 

Cape Town-based Karin Miller‘s collages showcase inspiration from Medieval tapestries, the dichotomies of beauty and tragedy, and dinner table taboos. She uses her work to speak about social, political, and historical issues, but that’s not to say Miller’s work is without humor – you just have to know where to look.

“I love the fact that I can take items out of context and place them wherever I want, because life is a collaboration of different points of view; and I get nervous when people start believing things only from one side, their side.”

 

 

 

 

 

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