#365quotes2016 + Mixbook

 

2016 was the second time I completed my 365 quotes project on Instagram, and it would be a shame not to document it after all the time put in. So I teamed up with the creative folks over at Mixbook to help make it a reality in the form of a hardcover photobook that I can have as a longtime reminder.

 

 

After deciding on a square 8.5 x 8.5″ photobook I chose to start with one of Mixbook’s templates – Minimal White – rather than work from an entirely blank slate. The platform is really simple to use and allowed me to change page layouts and fonts once I began, as well as add pages (up to 399). There’s also the option to add things like stickers and backgrounds to further customize your project, so all-in-all you have complete control over your design.

 

 

Each page of my photobook has the same vertical off-center layout because I wanted all 365 quotes to have the same weight and presence with the exception of the cover. This seemed like the obvious choice since they were all the same shape when initially shared on Instagram and I wanted to retain that integrity.

 

 

I was also happy to learn that Mixbook uses only the highest quality heavy-weight papers that are ethically sourced from sustainable forests and certified by the Forest Stewardship Council and the Rainforest Alliance. Huge bonus!

The end result is just as I hoped it would be, clean and minimal with each quote stealing the show from the page before. (Now what else can I make a book of?)

 

 

This post sponsored by Mixbook. All words and opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that help Design Crush create fresh content!

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DIY Abstract Embroidery Hoop Art

 

Welcome to our second new series of 2017! After nearly ten years of sharing the creativity of others, I thought it was high time we started creating more ourselves. These projects are just as much for me as they are for you. Working in a creative industry tends to have the opposite effect of what you might expect, and my own personal art has taken a backseat. I aim to change that starting with this post.

So, what can you expect? A loosely guided art project once a month that leaves plenty of room to explore and make your own. I’ll share my own take on it and leave you to the rest with a list of supplies and your own hands.

 

 

 

Supplies
• embroidery hoop(s)
• embroidery fabric
• acrylic paints
• palette knife (a disposable plastic knife will do in a pinch)
• acrylic paint brush
• jar with water for rinsing
• paper towels
• paint palette (or paper plate)
• scissors

 

 

I began by finding two color palettes I liked that could be easily mixed and matched – mainly blues, corals, goldenrod, and grey. I also knew that I wanted my three hoops to be related in style to look cohesive when hung together, and I accomplished that in two ways. First I made sure to use colors from the first two pieces together in the third, and second I made each painting slightly more organized in style than the previous. (Can you tell the order?)

 

 

Begin by disassembling the embroidery hoop and stretching the embroidery fabric over the inner hoop before pulling the fabric taut and replacing and tightening the outer hoop. I waited until the end of the project to trim off excess fabric from the back, but you could do that now as well.

Next you’ll want to pick up that paint brush and paint the entire “canvas” background however you see fit, making sure to paint over the top edge of the embroidery hoop as well. (Sidenote: this is the only time I used a brush throughout)

 

 

After the background is dry it’s time to put that palette knife to work. Squeeze each of your chosen paint colors onto your palette, and if you’re mixing a new color remember that it’s always better to mix too much than too little because it’ll be nearly impossible to recreate that color again. Load up the underside of the knife with a dollop of paint and use it as though you’re icing a cake. I didn’t bother waiting for colors to dry in between, just used a gentle hand to avoid mixing. The paint should be thick enough on the fabric that you can see definition, no need to refrain.

 

 

Once finished I let these guys hang out for a solid 24-hours to dry. Those thick layers of paint will take at least that long to set up fully. I then used some small finishing nails to hang them on the wall, just under each hoop closure.

I hope you love this new series and will join me in bringing more creativity into your life! And if you complete any of the projects I’d love to see – just tag @designcrush.

 

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Jim Osman

 

The word that comes to mind when I view Jim Osman‘s sculptures and installations is this – balance. In physicality, in use of color, and in viewing. Nearly all of Jim’s work uses wood, paper, paper, and hardware for stability, in the end reminding me of the most stunning game of Jenga.

 

 

 

 

 

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Stefaan De Croock / Strook

 

Strook is the word used to refer to the collage work of Bruges-based artist Stefaan De Croock. His signature collage art causes viewers to take second look as familiar shapes come into focus through unusual combinations of reused mediums, such as old wood doors and concrete slabs. Upcycling is an important part of Stefaan’s creative process, and he’s constantly on the search for old wood items. Stefaan never paints or treats these pieces, instead embracing their patina.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Camera Accessories

Taking a good photo is one thing, taking care of the equipment that creates it is another. Just think about how important your phone case is to protecting that device and you’ll see where I’m coming from. If you’re using a digital or film camera A. It’s probably not cheap and B. You want to treat it like an investment. A good strap gives you security when shooting, a solid bag protects your camera when it’s not in use, and lens bags add a layer of protection when you’re switching between several during a fun day or a shoot.

 

1/ Camera Lens Bags   2/ Camera Wrist Strap   3/ Compact Camera Bag   4/ Deakin Handmade Leather Camera Strap   5/ Personalized Leather Camera Strap   6/ Camera Neck Strap   7/ Pop Up Camera Case   8/ Sebastian Camera Bag   9/ Vintage Camera Straps   10/ SOLAS Camera Bag

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Eiko Ojala

 

Let this be a lesson in always reading the fine print, because these pieces by Estonian artist Eiko Ojala aren’t made from paper. The depth and texture of each one is created digitally, raw edges and all. Ojala loves working with light and shadow while keeping his artworks minimal and focused on the beauty of shapes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Let’s Talk Concrete Floors

Kailey J. Flynn

If I lived in a warmer climate I’d have concrete flooring in my home, no questions asked. Not only is it easy to clean, it can also be customized in any number of ways. Stenciled, stamped, polished, acid stained, dyed, painted, and more. These days the material is being appreciated for the raw beauty it can bring to a space, rather than relegated to warehouses and big box stores. The different textures and variations available make concrete feel anything but cold, making it a great fit for modern styles and more.

 

My Domaine

 

A Pair & A Spare

 

Nicoline Olsen

 

Hertha Hurnaus Photography

 

Brooke Holm

 

Design*Sponge

 

Barbara Hill Design

 

Vogue Living

 

Dustjacket Attic

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Lane Walkup

 

These elaborately sculpted metal hangers by Portland artist Lane Walkup just make me so happy! Inspired by the fluidity of minimal shapes and the chemistry behind metalwork, you can see just how much special attention has been paid to fun details and quality structure. And YES, you can actually use them as hangers if you so wish. Each one is the size of a regular hanger and is coated with a light plastic for functionality purposes. (Lane also designs jewelry.)

 

 

 

 

 

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