DIY Plexiglass Painting

 

My infamously non-functioning fireplace felt like it needed a little pizzazz after the holiday decor came down last month. I’ve left a strand of battery-powered mercury lights up for the rest of winter and a dozen prayer candles in the firebox, but it didn’t feel like enough. So then I relocated a plant (that I brought all the way home as a carry-on from Palm Springs!) to the hearth and that helped a little bit more. But then whole time I knew what would really perk it up would be art.

 

 

Plexiglass is one of my favorite surfaces to paint on, a little unusual I know. But you can’t beat the way the paint effortlessly glides around the surface and I love the way it feels so light, whether placed on the floor or hung on the wall with a large bulldog clamp.

 

 

Supplies

plexiglass (this piece measures 16 x 20″)
craft paint
palette or paper plate
large round brush
• water jar

 

 

I flipped through a few of my Pinterest boards for inspiration, and settled on an asymmetrical design using three colors – pale pink, soft grey, and olive green. After peeling off the protective film all plexiglass should have, I began in the southwest corner with the pink and worked my way up and out, making curved swoops with my brush and leaving plenty of space in between. Sort of spastic motions really. After the pink dried I went back in with the grey and did the same, filling in about half of the gaps and when that dried I filled in the rest with the green.

 

 

As always with our DIY projects, this is just a loose idea of what you could do with these materials. I love creating abstract art because it helps me get my emotions out, but maybe you like landscapes or portraits. Go with it.

(If you missed January’s project, check it out here.)

 

1

Kevin Perkins

 

I’d like to wear one of Kevin Perkins‘ paintings around like a caftan. The Dallas-based artist has always been enthralled by the natural world, he pulls this love into his work by embracing earthy color combinations, textures, and the rhythms of life and death. Traditional landscapes take on the feel of abstract worlds in another time and place.

 

 

 

 

 

0

Isabella Nazzarri

 

Isabella Nazzarri‘s art makes me feel so many things, above all else elation. But what fascinates me most is her definition of millennial art. Nazzarri essentially says that abstraction and figuration are things of the past, that these dated classifications are no longer functional or important. A read through of her Texts section goes much more in depth and I found it very worthwhile.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Print Edition: February 2017

Composition 505 by Chad Wys

 

Lune Watercolor and Ink Original by Louet Folk

 

Never Let Me Go by Henn Kim

 

On Moth’s Wings by Lauren Blair

 

T.S. Eliot Quote by Old English Co.

 

Orange Flower Fleurs by Sébastien Bouvier

 

The Neighbors by Home of DODO

 

The World is Your Oyster by Sugar Paper

 

We Welcome All Letterpress Poster by OKO Gallery

 

Vertical Cactus by Fox Hollow Design Co.

0

Jaq Chartier

 

Jaq Chartier‘s paintings explore two of my favorite things – scientific method and paint. Each of her works is a test meant to discover something new about materials and what they do. Inspired in part by images of DNA gel electrophoresis, Chartier investigates the migration of various stains through layers of paint and acrylic gels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

André Schulze

 

German artist André Schulze takes his inspiration from the East German landscape and architecture he encounters biking around Dresden. After photographing industrial architecture, rail architecture, nameless buildings, and typical houses, Schulze turns them into paintings to preserve what is slowly disappearing from the East German landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Philip Govedare

 

Philip Govedare‘s interpretation of our many landscapes are compelling and beautiful. The light, color, texture, and atmosphere he brings to each helps give meaning to each place.

My work is both a response to and an interpretation of the world, but it also imparts sentiment through projection that comes from a perspective of anxiety about the condition of landscape and nature in our world today. I endeavor to create a fictional response to an observed phenomenon, a metaphor that is infused with a blend of celebration, apprehension and doubt about our place in the natural world. In this manner, this work may allude to the past and simultaneously project into the future.

 

 

 

 

 

0

DIY Abstract Embroidery Hoop Art

 

Welcome to our second new series of 2017! After nearly ten years of sharing the creativity of others, I thought it was high time we started creating more ourselves. These projects are just as much for me as they are for you. Working in a creative industry tends to have the opposite effect of what you might expect, and my own personal art has taken a backseat. I aim to change that starting with this post.

So, what can you expect? A loosely guided art project once a month that leaves plenty of room to explore and make your own. I’ll share my own take on it and leave you to the rest with a list of supplies and your own hands.

 

 

 

Supplies
• embroidery hoop(s)
• embroidery fabric
• acrylic paints
• palette knife (a disposable plastic knife will do in a pinch)
• acrylic paint brush
• jar with water for rinsing
• paper towels
• paint palette (or paper plate)
• scissors

 

 

I began by finding two color palettes I liked that could be easily mixed and matched – mainly blues, corals, goldenrod, and grey. I also knew that I wanted my three hoops to be related in style to look cohesive when hung together, and I accomplished that in two ways. First I made sure to use colors from the first two pieces together in the third, and second I made each painting slightly more organized in style than the previous. (Can you tell the order?)

 

 

Begin by disassembling the embroidery hoop and stretching the embroidery fabric over the inner hoop before pulling the fabric taut and replacing and tightening the outer hoop. I waited until the end of the project to trim off excess fabric from the back, but you could do that now as well.

Next you’ll want to pick up that paint brush and paint the entire “canvas” background however you see fit, making sure to paint over the top edge of the embroidery hoop as well. (Sidenote: this is the only time I used a brush throughout)

 

 

After the background is dry it’s time to put that palette knife to work. Squeeze each of your chosen paint colors onto your palette, and if you’re mixing a new color remember that it’s always better to mix too much than too little because it’ll be nearly impossible to recreate that color again. Load up the underside of the knife with a dollop of paint and use it as though you’re icing a cake. I didn’t bother waiting for colors to dry in between, just used a gentle hand to avoid mixing. The paint should be thick enough on the fabric that you can see definition, no need to refrain.

 

 

Once finished I let these guys hang out for a solid 24-hours to dry. Those thick layers of paint will take at least that long to set up fully. I then used some small finishing nails to hang them on the wall, just under each hoop closure.

I hope you love this new series and will join me in bringing more creativity into your life! And if you complete any of the projects I’d love to see – just tag @designcrush.

 

0

Barnaby Whitfield

 

Miami-born artist Barnaby Whitfield works with a slew of mediums – pastel, oil, chalk, charcoal, and more – to create portraits that feel as though they have one foot in this world and the other in the next. Each one looks as though it’s breaking through the veil.

 

 

 

 

 

0