Jen Mann

 

In today’s age of selfies galore, Jen Mann’s paintings step back and explore human identities a bit deeper.

In the society of “me”, where we document ourselves like celebrities and share our lives online for everyone, the self is a prevalent, and important topic to our generation. Our identities are curated like our online profiles to reflect only the parts of ourselves we choose to keep alive. Who am I? Who are you? What does my life mean? Why am I alive? Mann’s work aims to address these very illusive questions, and explore, but not necessarily answer all of them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hannah Secord Wade

 

Maine-based artist Hannah Secord Wade creates luscious oil and acrylic paintings that are piles of… stuff. All sorts of things. But to me Wade’s Everything All Together series also resemble ice cream sundaes with multiple toppings, compost heaps from the kitchen, and tropical mountains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sam Chirnside

 

If you’re feeling drained from this week – or this year – Sam Chirnside‘s psychedelic paintings might be just the thing to boost your energy levels. The Berlin-based artist, designer, and creative director mainly uses oils to create these trippy pieces that are equally at home on album covers or a gallery wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ekaterina Popova

 

Ekaterina Popova‘s paintings centered around the idea of home, and the unmade beds that often find themselves beneath her brush, have me thinking about sultry summer nights and the warm spring ones we’ve already had that left me throwing off the covers. Popova references old photographs, images, magazine cutouts, and books that remind her of her old life in Russia to create these fictitious places that will inevitable make you feel something.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thomas Cian

 

Milan-based artist Thomas Cian is a very gifted man, especially when it comes to portraiture. His watercolor pieces combine colors and shapes that would never represent any part of the human form one their own, except when brought together under his brush they do and they’re lovely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jérome Romain

 

French painter Jérome Romain has a knack for capturing the mundane moments in life and elevating them to the nth level through his brush. His photorealistic style captures every detail, highlight, and shadow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Print Edition: April 2017

Arranged Shapes by Christopher Bettig

 

Botanica #3 Tropical Fern by OAK Gallery

 

Figure C by Kyle Steed

 

Greyscale Kitties by Stay Home Club

 

Hey Ho by Above & Beyond

 

Leaf Lines by Silke Bonde

 

It’s Going to Be O.K. by Ladyfingers Letterpress

 

Woman Collage by Ricardo Garcia

 

We Rise by Kaela Rawson

 

X-Files Desert Screen Print by Genuine Human

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DIY Pencil Eraser Pattern Art

 

Last month was a whirlwind, so we’re doubling down on DIY art projects in April – here’s the first. I want to bring the joy and carelessness of art class back with these projects, in other words nothing complicated and lot of free spiritedness. We can all remember using a pencil’s eraser to create a stamp, but today we’re using one to paint!

 

 

I love using household items to create, and with a pencil there’s no worry about messing it up because you can simply throw it away when finished if you’d like. Like all of our art DIYs this one is fast and loose, stick to a pattern if you’d like or be more abstract. Go monotone with one color or use the whole rainbow.

 

 

Supplies
canvas panel, I used an 8″ x 10″
• craft paint
• pencil with fresh eraser
• palette or paper plate

 

 

I started by eyeballing the center of the canvas and creating the middle square that’s twelve dots wide by twelve tall, but if you’re not the greatest at visualizing measurements just get out your ruler and measure to find the middle. All of the other squares were built off of that initial shape and the number of dots used. With each dip of my eraser in the paint I was able to create about three dots before having to reload, so some of them are more opaque than others. I didn’t pay too much attention to keeping super straight columns and rows, and in hindsight I actually wish it had turned out a bit more carefree. This DIY was really cathartic because I loved the mindless repetition.

 

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Silke Bonde / Sky Collection

 

Silke Bonde is a Copenhagen-based is an artist and designer hoping to share the joy of nature through her work, reminding us to slow down and enjoy the smaller things in life. The good news for us is that her latest series of four – Sky Collection – is available as prints.

When I think of the sky I imagine an enormous canvas that every human being gazes at every day. The sky changes its colors and structure every minute, and it is able to change and influence our mood and circadian rhythm. We are able to control much in life, but the sky is unchangeable, which is exactly why this phenomenon in my opinion is so fantastic.

I am intrigued by the blue sky’s revitalising effect and fascinated by the starlit sky a cold winter’s night. The sky is humanities common ground, a master piece which we need to protect and value every single day.

 

 

 

 

 

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Dana Oldfather

 

Dana Oldfather‘s paintings are so full of life and energy, I’d like to jump inside one and bounce around for awhile. They remind me a little of electrical storms with each one’s mood dictated by the color palette Oldfather has chosen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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