Astrid Elisabeth

 

I follow so many tattoo artists that I could probably have a site about that subcategory of creativity alone! My current favorite is Astrid Elisabeth, a true creative whirlwind who moves between tattooing, illustrating, and creating music with ease. Most of her art depicts the human body, some of it on the X-rated side, through line drawings and a subtle use of color.

 

 

 

 

 

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KITCHIBE

 

KITCHIBE is a brand of room fragrances created through a three-way collaboration between Shiono Koryo, a Japanese fragrance company with a lengthy history, Housen-gama, a producer of traditional Mino ceramics, and Qurz Inc., a company founded by the designer Takumi Shimamura. They offer six marbled, modern diffusers and six scents that evoke different aspects of Japanese culture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lorenzo Gritti

 

Lorenzo Gritti is a Milan-based illustrator who specializes in creating magazine editorials, books covers, and packaging. In each piece he explores the conceptual side of visual communications and various techniques of digital painting through a limited palette and rudimentary shapes. Gritti’s portfolio is exceptionally robust, but you should also have a look at his Instagram account.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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James Lake

 

Sculptor James Lake chose cardboard with which to create his lifelike sculptures because it’s a non-traditional option and he wouldn’t need a studio to work. He later found the benefits to include how inexpensive the material is and how easy it is to recycle! And by blurring the line between high and lowbrow art and making sculpture affordable, Lake has been able to take his art to the community through resources and workshops.

 

 

 

 

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Jasmin Blanc

 

Jasmin Blanc is a one-woman jewelry shop in Romania that began in 2010 as a hobby for shop owner Erika. Since then it’s become so much more. (I can relate!) Her current jewelry line is crafted in ceramics with a focus on delicate, feminine shapes, pastel colors, and detailed textures. Jasmin Blanc also has some lovely home decor and tableware pieces in stock.

 

 

 

 

 

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Anja Wülfing

 

German artist Anja Wülfing paints over photographs from the turn of the 19th century and adds what she refers to as oversized visitors – animal heads! The two aspects paired together have a surreal yet eery feel about them, and I couldn’t help but venture a guess as to what each scenario entailed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Print Edition: April 2018

The Sun, the Breeze the Smell of Lemon and Olive Oil by RF Alvarez

 

Temple by Laura Berger

 

Start With Yes by Anthony Burrill

 

Kumquats by Jonathan Lo

 

Hazy Sun 01 by All the Way to Paris & Paper Collective

 

Goodbye Mountain by Matthew Korbel-Bowers

 

Less Cool and More Boring by Will Bryant

 

Formation by A’Driane Nieves

 

FEMALE 05 by Caroline Walls

 

Geometric Poster by Athena Posters

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Aleksey Kondratyev / Ice Fishers

 

Aleksey Kondratyev‘s document-style photographs in Ice Fishers shines a light on what can be a brutal career. These Kazakh fishermen find shelter from temperatures as low as minus forty degrees in small tents of reused plastic packaging.

I was interested in examining the aesthetic forms of these improvised protective coverings and the way in which they function as inadvertent sculptures. I chose to focus on the materials and their surfaces as signifiers of underlying global influence and the improvisation that occurs from economic necessity.

 

 

 

 

 

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Lisa Nilsson / Tissue Series

 

Lisa Nilsson‘s Tissue Series is crafted entirely from mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books, each anatomical cross-section quilled to detailed perfection. Check out the detail in the last image below to get a better idea of what goes into even a small section of work. (Seems satisfying, doesn’t it?)

They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who are said to have made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time. I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.

 

 

 

 

 

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