Simone Roscher

 

Simone Roscher‘s Instagram account is full of the Vienna-based photographer’s moody, thought provoking work. While it’s all clearly a reflection of her own depths and emotions there’s something there to be felt by all who view it, no matter the translation.

 

 

 

 

 

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Unfolded

 

Photographers Daniel Carrillo and Eirik Johnson collaborated on this stunning project. Unfolded uses full and half-plate daguerreotypes to explore the creases of unfolded origami pieces and paper airplanes. The iridescent surface of the daguerreotype plates pick up every facet, giving each two dimensional piece of paper added depth and dimension.

 

 

 

 

 

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Samantha Wall

 

Korean-born, Portland-based artist Samantha Wall creates work full of human emotion, all of them. Aggression, weakness, loss, and self-reflection are just a few that she explores through ink and raw talent.

“The expression of emotions provides a doorway into private experiences that reveal our commonality, a smile could indicate pleasure and a frown, sorrow. These communicable emotions reach outward from within, making our bodies transparent. I am interested in the emotions that are more difficult to penetrate and are cloaked even from our own awareness. These are the emotions that sculpt our psyches, erect psychological boundaries, and fill our shadows.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Emilio Villalba

 

Contemporary portrait painter Emilio Villalba has always been fascinated by the messy parts – emotions, obsessions, and urges. While his works are inspired by the works of the past, the way Villalba pieces elements together to create feels completely modern.

The new visuals are a nod to the modern art aesthetic. Subtle shifts, repetition, (re)placement, or absence of facial features are attempts to create a feeling of dissonance and pressure in the viewer. I want someone to be drawn in by the uncanny nature of a piece and still feel safe to explore the feelings and reactions the pressure gives rise to.

 

 

 

 

 

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Caitlin T. McCormack

 

Philadelphia-based artist Caitlin T. McCormack creates some truly gnarly skeletons, first by stiffening up-cycled textiles and then crocheting with them to create brittle bone-like structures. Once finished, she sets each piece against a black or white backdrop or inside a glass case, to further achieve the desired macabre effect.

Shop Caitlin T. McCormack’s work

 

 

 

 

 

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Tin Can Forest

 

If you’re at all fascinated with the occult – whether just during the month of October or more – have a look at the work of Tin Can Forest. Canadian artists and publishers Pat Shewchuk and Marek Colek work collaboratively to create art, video installations, films, and books inspired by the the forests of Canada, Slavic art, and occult folklore. Their pieces are darkly beautiful with stories to tell.

Shop the work of Tin Can Forest

 

 

 

 

 

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Elsa Mora

 

Artist Elsa Mora creates across a wide range of mediums, but today it’s her way with paper that has my attention – particularly her Mindscapes series. The collection of eight pieces explores the human brain through different techniques like embossing and intricate paper cutting.

 

 

 

 

 

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Literary Witches: A Celebration of Magical Women Writers

Virginia Woolf

Octobers are usually filled with witchy tales, but Literary Witches: A Celebration of Magical Women Writers celebrates rather damns the women within its pages. Poet Taisia Kitaiskaia and artist Katy Horan joined forces to draw a powerful connection between witches and visionary female writers through written and painted portraits that honor well-known and obscure authors alike.

Buy the book

 

 

Agatha Christie

 

Mary Shelley

 

Shirley Jackson

 

Octavia E. Butler

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Splice

 

Splice is a collaborative project between photographer Andrew McGibbon and art director Cassandra Fumi. Each piece of ice art is only temporary – an act of self-destruction on display for only a short amount of time. Beet juice, puzzle pieces, toy cars and more filled each block before being photographed and dissipating entirely. What’s more, each print is a unique one of a kind, meaning there is only one print available for each piece.

 

 

 

 

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Erika Sanada / Odd Things

 

Erika Sanada‘s Odd Things sculptures are beautifully disturbing. Her strange, creepy creatures have extra body parts or small deformities that set them apart while also resembling adorable animals that you wouldn’t mind snuggling up with. I love the detailed skin and musculature that Sanada captures so well.

 

 

 

 

 

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