April Favorites

1/ Craft the Rainbow: 40 Colorful Paper Projects from The House That Lars Built
My friend Brittany created this incredible book for the color lovers of the world. Inside you’ll find 40 projects using nothing but the creative power of paper! I’m hooked.

2/ Case Study Table Top Mushroom Planter with Plinth
I love Case Study’s modern ceramic planters! This is the latest I’ve added to my collection, an interesting mushroom shape in their new mustard hue. In case you missed it we’re giving one away, too!

3/ The Simplicity Collection from Aera
This little home fragrance machine helps keep my home smelling pet-free, and their latest collection – citrus, lavender, white tea, sandalwood, cherry blossom, and vanilla – are the perfect scents for this transitional time of year.

4/ Saya Designs Taro Hair Stick
I’ve been using this gorgeous hair stick constantly in lieu of hair elastics. It helps keep my hair from breaking off and the dark, reddish rosewood paired with golden tamarind is just beautiful.

5/ Eastside Design Co. Enamel Pins
Are you an enamel pin junky, too? These little guys from a college friend’s shop are my latest additions.

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Dan Stockholm / By Hand

 

For Dan Stockholm‘s By Hand installation he created a series of negative plaster casts of his cupped hands into red clay bricks that reveal different amounts of his palms. The project is a follow up to a project from 2013 that followed his father’s death…

Fascinated by places and architecture with an innate historical significance and narrative tension, Dan Stockholm practises a ‘creative archaeology’. The act of touching has become a fundamental part of his working process where for example, in 2013 days after his father’s death he methodically touched his father’s entire house centimetre by centimetre and subsequently made and adapted plaster casts of his handprints for ongoing sculptures and installations.

 

 

 

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Samuel Shumway

 

Samuel Shumway is a stop motion animator, videographer, prop designer, and fabricator (whew) based in NYC. He sculpts these delectable little meals entirely out of paper, snipping and folding until every little bit is just so. Anyone hungry for pancakes all of a sudden??

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jessica Hess

 

Jessica Hess is a hyperrealistic landscape painter based out of Oakland, California. Her depictions of the urban environment cheer on and validate graffiti by flipping it on its head, using oil paints on canvas and gouache on paper in place of spray paint on walls.

Shop Jessica Hess’ work

 

 

 

 

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Lin Cheung / Delayed Reactions

 

Simple statement pins are generally intended as a cheap throwaway, but Lin Cheung has reimagined them as more in her Delayed Reactions series. Rather than cheap metal, Cheung used semi-precious materials and stones to make her carved brooches. Her approach to designing and reinterpreting traditional jewelery and objects is a personal response to everyday experiences and observations – in this case her mixed emotions about current affairs.

 

 

 

 

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Jillian Evelyn

 

Jillian Evelyn‘s contorted paintings and murals explore something I (and perhaps you) are well acquainted with – the depths of awkwardness, discomfort, and expectations both external and internal. Her figures are drenched in color, usually latex and acrylic paint on wood, but recently she’s started branching out into larger scale work.

Shop Jillian Evelyn’s work

 

 

 

 

 

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Peter Judson

 

Peter Judson is a London-based designer and illustrator with a flat graphic style that I just can’t seem to get enough of. Whether it’s a detailed city scene, a super simplified design classic, or a collection of colored tilings, Judson attacks each piece with obvious passion and zeal.

Shop Peter Judson’s work

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Fran O’Neill

 

It’s difficult not to flat-out ogle the stuttering, tripping paintings of Brooklyn-based artist Fran O’Neill. Not only do I want to hang every single one in my house, I also want to watch as she creates one because I’m betting it’s one fascinating technique.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Roland Kiyola Piano

 

She’s not cheap, but maaaaaaaan is she pretty. I’m of course talking about the Roland Kiyola Piano. It’s a MoMA Design Store exclusive, handcrafted in Japan by furniture-maker Karimoku. The modern designed digital instrument is minimal all around, but with a sound reminiscent of an acoustic model. I’ve never regretted ending my piano lessons more!

 

 

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