Pete Johnson / A to Z

 

Pete Johnson travels globally working with nonprofits and NGOs, photographing different cultures and subjects as he travels and works on humanitarian projects. In his latest project, A to Z, Pete’s collected some of his most powerful images and designating them to a corresponding letter. The resulting alphabet pairs graphic design with photography to create some truly dynamic images.

 

 

 

 

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Crystal Liu

 

The most beautiful, otherworldly landscapes abound in Crystal Liu‘s art. Gouache, watercolor, ink, and collage all come together in an unexpected way to create marbled pools, golden sunsets, and pastel skies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nuria Riaza

 

Nuria Riaza was a child of the 90s, and maybe that’s where his weapon of choice – the Bic blue crystal ballpoint pen – gained its power over him. Occasionally it’s mixed with other mediums like embroidery or marbling, but that famous blue ink is always front and center. The characters Riaza creates are pulled from old portraits or movies and bent to his will in each collage-like piece. Check out his shop to add a piece to your own collection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Canon Wine Tilt

 

Canon Wine Tilt takes any table or countertop to the next level. Crafted in 3D printed porcelain, Canon is designed to hold most standard wine bottles. The cylinder tilts the bottle at a 45-degree angle and can function as either storage or to provide greater aeration for an already open bottle. At the base, its horizontal tunnel holds a standard corkscrew and is the perfect hiding place for a cork and foil, to keep the table tidy.

 

 

 

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Dana Oldfather

 

Dana Oldfather‘s paintings are so full of life and energy, I’d like to jump inside one and bounce around for awhile. They remind me a little of electrical storms with each one’s mood dictated by the color palette Oldfather has chosen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Andy DeCola

 

Andy DeCola creates the unexpected – in the form of paintings that masquerade as collages. The Burlington, Ontario-based artist paints and creates as a response to the media that surrounds us as a culture. It’s the interesting color palettes and juxtaposition of patterns that catch my eye most.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Charlotte Hopkins Hall

 

London-based painter Charlotte Hopkins Hall‘s figures appear to be lost in their own thoughts, ignoring the viewer and everything else. But if you had the picture perfect hair they each possess, wouldn’t you as well? Charlotte paints the dreamiest highlights, and the negative space she uses in every piece makes them stand out all the more.

 

 

 

 

 

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Grant Legassick / Urban Etchings

 

Grant Legassick‘s Urban Etchings are in a league of their own. By taking multiple photos and layering them overtop one another – similar to a double exposure – Legassick creates the illusion of a pencil drawing or etching. Each city street turns into a story with its own flow and imagined movement.

 

 

 

 

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Loes Heerink / Vendors from Above

 

The lives of street vendors are fascinating and a bit mysterious. Photographer Loes Heerink captured Hanoi’s vending scene, aptly named Vendors from Above, oftentimes standing atop the city’s bridges for hours in wait of the perfect shot. Their bicycles packed high with fruits, vegetables, and flowers, each vender wakes at 4am and pedals miles per day selling her goods. Heerink is currently selling a book of the series through her site.

 

 

 

 

 

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Elisabeth Heidinga

 

In her work, Toronto-based Elisabeth Heidinga combines the often entwined worlds of arts and crafts. Several painted canvases are cut into fine strips before being woven into an entirely new piece of art.

Historically, painting is largely male-dominated and craft is traditionally identified as a female activity, and my paintings bring these two worlds together. However, this is beyond gender issues, but simply two opposing concepts meeting, challenging and rethinking the mountains that stand in our way – thoughtfully taking apart and reassembling what lies before us to create a new perspective. It’s the ups and downs, the give and the take, the blunders and the victories.

 

 

 

 

 

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