Derrick Velasquez

 

I’m crazy about the work of Derrick Velasquez! Layers upon layers upon layers of interest.

My most recent work deals with forces projected onto manufactured and industrially engineered materials. Some of these forces are natural, such as an accumulated weight created by gravity, and some are more forced like tension applied by testing an object’s flexibility to its breaking point. The demands put on these materials reveal and obscure structures of both their intended consumer use and the qualities of the material itself.  By the use of marine vinyl, masonite, handmade half-scale 2X4s, plywood, and found objects, I aim to question the way we physically interact with the tangible and manufactured structures of everyday life. Through an investigative manipulation that observes and skews nominal measurements, my work teases out our psychological relation to the dimensions and conditions given by such materials. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jessica Waterman

 

Jessica Waterman‘s wood and textile pieces make me want to visit Labrador and Newfoundland immediately! From colorful row houses to nature’s wilderness, inspiration comes from the surrounding areas, woods and textiles chosen because they reflect the land’s character. There’s no denying the beauty of the carpentry and art creations coming out of Jessica’s studio where she combines her carpentry skills with a costume design degree.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10 Days of Design Crush Anniversary Giveaways: Day 6 Rebecca Atwood

 

Ten years ago this month I started Design Crush as a place to gather inspiration for my day job as a graphic designer, and five years ago it became my full-time job. To thank you all, as well as highlight some of my favorite sponsors from over the years, we’ll be hosting ten days of giveaways in celebration of ten years of this little site that could.

 

 

I’ve followed Rebecca Atwood and her creative process for several years now, and her collection is forever expanding and getting better. Pillows, bedding, dining, wallpaper, art, and fabric by the yard in her signature colors and prints are the perfect pieces to mix in with what you already have to achieve that effortless vibe that so many find elusive.

 

 

 

 

The latest addition to Rebecca Atwood‘s line is embroidered fabric in seven different colors and patterns that were inspired by a trip to Mexico. Each look was thought out in her sketchbook before being realized and woven in India, then spot-embroidered. The line is ethically-made, just like everything Rebecca makes. And while undeniably beautiful, every single piece is also functional and meant to get better with use.

 

 

Aside from a set of Rebecca‘s cobalt shibori pillows that have been a mainstay on my bed for years, I’ve also had the pleasure of using her line of wallpaper. Rather than putting it on the walls, I decked out the back wall of my non-functioning fireplace with the marble in clay-blue for a bit of unexpected pattern in an otherwise dark spot.

 

 

Have you read her book, Living with Pattern? It’s one of my recent favorite home decor books, in it Rebecca covers how to work with patterns you may already own, how to add pattern to unexpected places, and the use of pattern in homes across the country. I highly recommend picking it up if you’re drawn to interiors, pattern, or a bohemian aesthetic.

 

 

And now for you! Rebecca has been generous enough to offer one of her Marble Stripe pillows in gray-lilac to a lucky reader! There are 22 ways to enter for a chance to win and you have 48-hours to get after it.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Beautiful Wears S/S 17

Paola Stripe Top // Chambray Stripe Rampling Tee // Joni Sweatshirt // O’Keefe Chambray Wrap Skirt

 

Nami 1-Piece Swimsuit // Matador Romper // Hazel Dress // Covill Dress

 

White Linen Boat Neck Dress // Oversized Long-Sleeve Shirt // Contrast Cotton Shirt // Long Elastic Waist Dress

 

The Nancy Dress // The Kheller Trouser // The Laurena Maxi // The Shit Tee

 

Black Crane Boat Neck Top, Print C // Black Crane Floral Dress // Black Crane Pleat Dress, Print A // Marion Dress

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Aki Inomata

 

Aki Inomata‘s girl, girl, girl… seems especially fitting as I found a rogue caterpillar sitting outside my bedroom door when I woke up one day last week. Inomata spent two years raising bagworms in order to give them pieces of material to use as their protective cases. It ended up being a kind of commentary on women’s fashion as well as womanhood in general.

Male bagworms leave their protective cases when they become adults, and become moths. However female bagworms remain in their protective cases for their whole lives and wait for the male bagworms. This reminded me of my own experience of being approached by hundreds of men, whilst the few men that I was interested in often didn’t even glance at me. Though the gender issue is meant to have changed in our generation, why is it that women still make much more effort than men concerning their appearances?

 

 

 

 

 

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Block Shop Table Linens

 

You may be familiar with Block Shop‘s traditional Indian hand block printed scarves, but did you know they recently released a line of table linens? Because they did and they’re ideal for summer entertaining. The easy California vibe of each scarf carries over effortlessly to table runners and napkins, furthering sisters Lily and Hopie’s mission to make heirloom textiles with a high social benefit and low environmental impact.

 

 

 

 

 

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Sarah K. Benning

 

Sarah K. Benning is a fiber artist who splits her time between the United States and Spain. It wasn’t until after graduating college that she realized her love for embroidery and turned it into a career, however. All bets are off as Sarah creates, picturing each piece as an illustration and often abandoning traditional stitches and techniques in favor of creating textile art that’s vibrant and fresh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lana Crooks

 

A combination of science and fantasy, Lana Crooks works with fabrics and found objects to create faux specimens and soft curiosities. Her technique easily fools you into believing what you’re looking at is actual bone that’s been bleached by the sun.

 

 

 

 

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Rumpl

 

These Rumpl blankets use the very same materials used in sleeping bags and puffy jackets, so you know they’re super light and mega warm. They’re comfortable, durable, and tested in harsh environments (that means when you curl up with yours on the couch it’s not going to fall apart) and give off an ever so slightly ’80s vibe that I love.

 

 

 

 

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