Franck Bohbot / Angels

 

French-born, New York-dwelling Franck Bohbot‘s photos all have a touch of the theatrical about them. His past work on film sets lends the formal and aesthetic influences of cinematography to his work, as well as a documentarian feel. The way Bohbot views L.A. in his Angels series isn’t necessarily the way billions of minds across the world imagine the city, but if you’ve ever visited and stepped outside of Hollywood you know it’s the truth.

“Almost everyone has some idea of what Los Angeles is, even if they’ve never been there. Home to Hollywood, the city churns out myth after American myth. Some see the city as a necessary part of a glamorous life — they migrate there to become stars. Others live ordinary lives and work ordinary jobs in this city of spectacle. Here, even the metallic glinting pole of exercise equipment along the shoreline, or a solitary streetlight in neon darkness, or a thrust of power lines cutting across the sky, captures something essential about the so-called “city of angels.” by Sarah V. Schweig

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Adding Exterior Character with James Hardie

 

It’s been nearly four years since I found myself buying an old house and moving back to the Pennsylvania town where I grew up. As you’ve seen, since then I’ve put my modern and eclectic stamp on the 118-year-old structure through projects and updates while trying to retain its character. I’ve added window shutters to the front facade, switched out all of the interior doorknobs, and replaced the front and backdoor entry sets among many other things.

The exterior is still not where I’d like it to be however, and doesn’t match up with my aesthetic. My hope is to give it a much needed facelift with new siding, as well as boxing in those columns and adding a porch that most certainly existed at some point in the past.

 

 

For your reference, this photo was taken last summer. The light fixture and mailbox have been replaced and some new plants have been added to the front flower bed, but that’s the extent of this past year’s progress.

One of my biggest peeves about the curb appeal – where the majority of the house’s character lies – is the mix of sidings used, both in colors as well as directionality. While I understand that this is an aesthetic some prefer, I’d love to have wide plank horizontal siding in one style and one color.

 

 

Something like this.

After putting some research time into this eventual project, I realized what a massive collection of products James Hardie has to offer as well as the quality that backs them up. Their product line offers a great selection of profiles, textures, widths, and colors, while their commitment to artistry and innovation allows for timeless designs and performance.

 

 

Now for the nitty gritty. James Hardie‘s ColorPlus Technology coats surfaces, edges, and features of each siding plank uniformly while multiple layers of color are baked onto each board for a great finish and a strong bond that resists chipping, peeling, cracking, and fading for years to come. With HardiePlank lap siding, HardieShingle siding, and HardiePanel vertical siding, you have the design versatility to achieve a look that’s sure to stand out on your street. They also allow you to enjoy the peace of mind that comes with a 30-year non-prorated warranty on siding, a 15-year non-prorated warranty on trim, and ColorPlus Technology with a 15-year limited finish warranty.

 

 

Only James Hardie fiber cement products are Engineered for Climate. In the northern U.S. and Canada, HZ5 products resist shrinking, swelling, and cracking even after years of wet or freezing conditions. (Perfect for climate zones that experience it all, like Pennsylvania!) HZ10 products resist damage from hot, humid conditions, blistering sun and more. These products are actually tougher than the elements – they stand up to storms and harsh weather, are water resistant to protect against swelling, warping and cracking, and also resist mold. They’re fire resistant and her reduce the time and money you’d spend on maintenance of other materials. With all of these assurances you can feel good about everything James Hardie has to offer.

 

 

At this point I have a specific idea of how I’d like to add more character to the exterior of my home, but if you need some help check out James Hardie’s site for additional design inspiration. And if you’d like to check out their siding in person be sure and request some free samples to compare – choose from textured, smooth, or beaded.

 

 

This post sponsored by James Hardie. All words and opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting our carefully chosen partners that help keep Design Crush creating fresh content! Follow James Hardie on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Houzz, and YouTube.

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Creativity Takes Courage: Dare to Think Differently + A Giveaway

 

Creativity tends to show up in my life as a feast or famine – is it like that for you, too? This year has particularly been full of highs and lows and I’m hoping everything will even out soon enough, after all challenging times generally point towards periods of growth.

The latest book from the co-founders and creative directors of Flow Magazine, Irene Smit and Astrid Van der Hulst, and Workman Publishing couldn’t have better timing. Creativity Takes Courage: Dare to Think Differently was released earlier this week. (If you’re unfamiliar with Flow, it’s a magazine that celebrates creativity, imperfection, and life’s little pleasures.) This is a creative book like no other – simultaneously a practical, hands-on guide to stretching your creative muscles as well as an inspirational book that focuses on the pleasure of the process.

 

 

Creativity Takes Courage is organized around a series of twelve so-called dares that are intended to break you out of your usual creative habits and provide a fresh perspective to help you step outside of your comfort zone. (And man, do I need that frequently!) It’s a book both about creativity and a book that inspires creativity with tons of prompts, tips, and challenges to complete in your own time.

 

 

Most chapters end with an And Now You section of questions, the answers to which can be written directly right in the book. These questions follow the theme of the chapter – reexamining something you may consider a failure that could be seen as a learning process or questions that might help you break down a new project or challenge into more manageable parts for example.

 

 

There are lots of pull-out extras throughout the book – probably my favorite parts! Use the daily project notebook for getting started and focused on something as simple as saving your shopping list or receipts, drawing a cloud, or writing something positive on the sidewalk with chalk. Read about the importance of sleep in creativity, then decorate your sleeping space with tear-out inspirational images. Pull out the included Polaroid-style photo frames to use in framing your favorite photos, or use them to help you frame a scene before taking a picture.

 

 

Not every single page includes an interaction– there are also essays about and lessons on how to get started on a new project without getting overwhelmed, stepping outside of your comfort zone as a means to unlocking creativity, and learning how to enjoy being alone and doing nothing at all among others.

 

 

There’s no right or wrong way to use Creativity Takes Courage! Make your way straight through or jump around among the dares. Tear out pages to put on the refrigerator or mail some to a friend. Keep it by your bedside to work through when you first wake up or before you go to sleep. Dog-ear it, use it to your advantage, and realize what a gift true creativity can be.

Want to win a copy of Creativity Takes Courage: Dare to Think Differently for yourself or a friend? Keep scrolling for a ton of ways to enter!

 

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This post sponsored by Workman Publishing. All words and opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting our carefully chosen partners that help keep Design Crush creating fresh content!

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Eva LeWitt

 

Perhaps you’ve heard of legendary artist Sol LeWitt, but did you know he has a very talented daughter named Eva LeWitt? Some of her latest work is this installation made from polyurethane foam, latex, and plastic that’s entitled Untitled. Once installed the 13 pieces resemble overlapping curtains with a variety of shapes, colors, and textures giving each its own personality, while the materials they’re made from both hold them up and weigh them down.

 

 

 

 

 

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Cards for Perspective

 

Who doesn’t need a little bit of perspective now and again? Cards for Perspective is a collection of twenty cards featuring fresh views on life to help you restore calm and clarity.

We mistake what is manageable for a catastrophe; we despair of ourselves too soon; we alienate others by over-reacting; we don’t notice and appreciate what there is still to be grateful for; we forget we’re going to die and that a lot of today’s headache will soon be forgotten. These cards provide eloquent invitations to recover a wiser, calmer, redemptive perspective on our lives.

 

 

 

 

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Kristen Meyer

 

When my mind feels jumbled up I like to search out things that are all sorted out, that’s how I came upon the work of Kristen Meyer. Her background runs the gamut from floral design to interior decorating to window design and prop styling, and she puts them all to use when creating these organized geometric flat lays out of themed groupings.

Shop Kristen Meyer’s work

 

 

 

 

 

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Danze by Gerber Introduces the Draper and Vaughn Collections

 

One of the fastest ways to update your kitchen or bath is by swapping out the faucet and accompanying hardware to make your it feel more like your own. I did just that with all of the sinks in my first home and I’m looking to do it again in my current space. Danze by Gerber has two new kitchen and bath faucet collections – Vaughn and Draper – that look to be the perfect match for my modern-meets-118 year old house aesthetic.

 

 

The Draper collection is an updated classic with vintage detailing and soft industrial influences, the curved lines paired with geometric detailing give each piece a refined traditional elegance that would look right in just about any home. Choose from chrome and stainless steel finishes for kitchen fixtures and chrome and brushed nickel for bathroom fixtures.

 

 

 

If you’re looking for a more dynamic, streamlined design then the Vaughn collection is for you. These kitchen and bath faucets feature a beautiful transitional style and sophisticated look that would be a perfect match for a more modern or minimal space. Choose from chrome, stainless steel, and satin black for kitchen fixtures and chrome, stainless steel, satin black, and brushed nickel for bathroom fixtures.

The Draper and Vaughn collections both boast pulldown kitchen faucets with DockForce magnetic docking technology, a SnapBack retraction system, dual function sprayhead, drip-free ceramic disc valve, and a water efficient flow rate.

 

 

No matter which style you favor, both come equipped with an arsenal of features from Danze by Gerber that focus on design, function, quality, and experience.

We know that stylish reliability is born from the balance of form and function. We know that when we polish the outside, the inside gleams too. And we know that the result of our work isn’t just a faucet—it’s our pride. Because inside every one of our designs is not only Gerber quality, but our relentless dedication to bringing even more beauty to the world.

This post sponsored by Danze by Gerber. All words and opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting our carefully chosen partners that help keep Design Crush creating fresh content!

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Lou Ros

 

Los Ros is a Paris-based painter who got his artistic start doing graffiti. He carried that expressionistic style into his paintings, transforming what is clear into a blur. What I find most interesting about Ros is that he stops painting before he feels it’s actually finished…

“The moment where little is enough to suggest the stucture interests me, leaving the spectator’s imagination open at the moment the scene is starting to appear. Knowing when to stop before saying too much is what I tried to do.”

Shop Lou Ros’ work

 

 

 

 

 

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