Wicked.

Last night I saw the opening night performance of Wicked in Oklahoma City (it’s the next Broadway, dontcha know!) and it was absolutely amazing!

I’d read Gregory McGuire’s book back in 2004 when I was living in New York and the musical had just openned on Broadway. It seemed every person I saw on the subway had a copy of it in their hands, so I took their unspoken advice and bought a copy. I’m always hesitant about seeing a movie or performance after reading the book because most times so much is left out that it turns into a huge letdown (RE: Jurassic Park. The first time I’d ever read the book before seeing the movie – I was 12 and slighted for life!), but luckily this wasn’t the case.

The actresses who portrayed Elphaba and Glinda were amazing and full of life and personality. The set design was minimal, but intricate. And the score was awesome. I highly recommend getting tickets if it’s coming to your city any time soon. They go incredibly fast, so strike right away. We got ours the second day they were in sale and ended up ten rows from the very top in the balcony. Another piece of advice, rent the binoculars – it’s well worth it.

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Hammerpress.


I love design. I’m a design junkie. Some might even say design whore. And I can honestly say that I’ve not come across a body of work that has literally blown my mind in longer than I can remember. And then today happened and I found Hammerpress.

Hammerpress was founded in 1994 by Brady Vest who was busily turning the four-year-plan into the four-and-a-half-year-plan at Kansas City Art Institute. Years later, what started as a fascination for letterpress has developed into a full-blown business specializing in wedding invitations, custom artwork for restaurant chains, CD packaging, corporate identity, posters and art prints as well as a growing line of stationary products.

I, personally, would like to say Thank You, Brady. Thank You very much. Here are just a few of the pieces that caught my eye…

Concert Posters. Check out the site for about a hundred more. You can see how evident Hatch Show Print is in Vest’s work.

Darling Room ID.

2007 Wall Calendars.

Wedding Invitation.

Burlesque Postcards.

Saucy Gift Enclosures.

Holiday Gift Tag.

Holiday Gift Enclosures.

Long Cards.

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Sukie.

Apparently I’m on a roll today, at it’s not designing the logo I should be working on at work…

I tripped across this site from across The Pond for Sukie. Some cute stuff, some not so cute stuff – pick and choose.


These sticky notes are so fun. You receive eight different forest creature designs for £6.99 (damn the British and their pounds!).


This Alphabet handkerchief could also be used as a scarf or framed. £8.98 for this one and a variety of other designs available.

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Thomas Paul Stationary.


Thomas Paul’s new stationary line was revealed at the Stationary Show in New York a few weeks back. I’m a sucker for his pillows already, but stationary is even more my bag. (“Really?” you say.) It’s not yet available in stores and there’s not even any mention of it on his site, but I promise it’s in the works! Here’s a sample of the collection’s bokmarks courtesy of Design*Sponge.


Besides that, I’m really fascinated by homepages today. Thomas Paul’s is another fun one.

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Hammocks & High Tea.


I really like these cards by Hammocks & High Tea, but I must confess that what truly drew me in was their site and color scheme. I think it’s just beautiful and has inspired me today.

You can pick up this Hammock or Coconut Bread recipe card for $4 or a box of six for $18.


Hammocks & High Tea is the work Karen Young. H&H offers hand drawn, screen printed products that express a modern sensibility of exotic design. Most of Karen’s work is inspired by memories, old photos, and travels; trips to the zoo, walks through the town center, the open air market, etc.

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Hammocks & High Tea.


I really like these cards by Hammocks & High Tea, but I must confess that what truly drew me in was their site and color scheme. I think it’s just beautiful and has inspired me today.

You can pick up this Hammock or Coconut Bread recipe card for $4 or a box of six for $18.


Hammocks & High Tea is the work Karen Young. H&H offers hand drawn, screen printed products that express a modern sensibility of exotic design. Most of Karen’s work is inspired by memories, old photos, and travels; trips to the zoo, walks through the town center, the open air market, etc.

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Art School Girl.


Amy Jean Rowan translates the fortune cookie “In Bed” game to a sexy little card, applying fortunes extricated from cookies (she must eat a lot of Chinese food) to a deep red cardstock screen-printed with the de rigueur “IN BED.” Each card is one-of-a-kind, so which one you receive is a surprise until it shows up in the mail. Anybody in the mood for take out?

Check it out at Greer Chicago.

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Paper Stories.


Paper Stories is the brainchild of photographer, designer & teacher, Kelly Maron. In 2004, after creating all of the essentials that made her own wedding unique and special, it saddened her to think that the planning and designing portion would eventually end. So after eight years of teaching photography and graphic design, she left the educational field to work on something a little closer to home. Literally. She works out of a studio in her home.

I’m loving the juxtaposition of the snide phrases and beautiful, flowing designs of these notecards in the Bittersweet Collection. Cards are $5 each or $20 for all five.


The Family Marriage Ring is an amazing alternative to traditional family tree diagrams. Laid out in a circular design, the ring celebrates the history of a couple, starting from the center moving outward. With this being wedding season I thought this would be a great gift idea. Prints are $100-500 depending on the printing technique you choose.

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Ben Matthews.

Ben Matthews is an artist from Pittsburgh who spends his days painting signage for a local grocery store chain. It’s what he does in his off hours that’s truly amazing. His characters are based on imaginary bizarre inventions, old advertisements, sideshows, antique photographs and storybooks. The result is sometimes unsettling, but always mesmerizing. Matthews says that when he creates his art he tries to make the pieces look as though they’ve “already served their purpose” (i.e. worn). By doing so he creates a past for the posters and a history for us, the viewer, to unravel.



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